consonant

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Related to consonantal: coronal

con·so·nant

(kon'sŏ-nănt)
A speech sound produced by partial or complete obstruction to the flow of air at any point in the vocal apparatus.
[L. consono, to sound together]

con·so·nant

(kon'sŏ-nănt)
A speech sound produced by partial or complete obstruction to the flow of air at any point in the vocal apparatus.
[L. consono, to sound together]

consonant,

n a conventional speech sound produced, with or without laryngeal vibration, by certain successive contractions of the articulatory muscles that modify, interrupt, or obstruct the expired airstream to the extent that its pressure is raised.
consonant, semivowel,
n consonants that are like vowels both perceptually and physiologically.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless this rule is not applicable for ill-formed bi- consonantal (see Diagram 4) and tn-consonantal clusters (see Diagram
No entanto, haveria a insercao de um segmento consonantal epentetico, consoante de ligacao ou ainda um infixo que ocorre em determinados contextos, manifestando-se como -zinho.
Por exemplo, CardosoMartins e Batista (2005) pediram a criancas em idade prE-escolar para escrever pares de palavras que comecavam com a mesma letra e som consonantal (e.
Punctuation is supplied where necessary--which is, in fact, very frequently, the 1516 edition, like Ariosto's manuscripts, being very sparing in its use--short s replaces long S, and v consonantal u; the use of accents is regularized.
Her sound ranges from the musical playfulness of a piece like 'Angles" (with its fractured words, percussive finale, and references to musical terms) to daily journal pieces like the "Sky Scrapers" sequence (luxuriating in Lancashire diphthongs, speech rhythms, thick consonantal clusters, and slowed syllables) to the intense, sensuous, and political articulations of Interregnum and Escafeld Hangings that grab us by the neck and rattle our bones.
The ability of Eliezer Ben-Yehuda and other linguists to coin new words from the scant vocabulary stock of the Bible and the Talmud derives from this basis and the use of prefixes, suffixes and infixes that still retain the original consonantal root letters.
He typically employs conventional consonantal rhyme, but he uses enjambment so insistently that the reader, following the thread of the meaning, hardly notices the presence of rhyme.
147), where retention of a consonantal /j/ into the thirteenth century could lead to variable compensatory lengthening of the Vi 'smoothing' in the same way that Vowel 11 /e:i/ (as in die, high etc.
A similar picture emerges if we consider the use of three low-prestige consonantal features which are currently spreading in Britain (Kerswill 2003): the use of [f] for /[theta]/, the use of [v] for noninitial /[?
We also refer to Level III as the consonantal level.
The first-time visitor to the capital can be left puzzled by the strange consonantal combinations of the Welsh language.
Four irregular beats to a line, sometimes three in a row as in "mauve-blue sky," full rhymes and half-rhymes in tetrameters, most lines contain consonantal resonances within them, and a final couplet unexpectedly not echoing its sounds, although "dream" echoes "time," and "alone" echoes "station," "intention," and "companion.