conservation of matter

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Related to conservation of mass: law of conservation of mass

conservation of matter

(in physics) a law stating that matter can be neither created nor destroyed and that the amount of matter in the universe is finite. It is superseded by the special relativity equation e = mc2, but it is still applicable in the chemical process. Also called conservation of mass. See also conservation of energy.
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The thermal model simulates an icing wind tunnel by calculating particle and air properties using the conservation of mass, momentum and energy equations.
The conservation of mass for the movement of smoke in all shafts is (see Figure 3)
However, it is crucial that children are given the opportunity to question the principle of conservation of mass, as the visual representations children form from these experiences can be called upon in later years.
From the conservation of mass the density is proportional to the inverse of the cubic scale factor:
I trust he meant conservation of mass and energy together.
Both methods are rooted in balanced chemical equations as prescribed by Lavoisier's conservation of mass law.
Conservation of mass states that, for a steady state application, the mass going in a system should be equal to the mass going out.
Since material points move with the interface, and the conservation of mass at the moving interface is satisfied at any time, the kinematic boundary condition, Eq 11, leads then to the following equation describing the local change of the interface position:
The local gapwise average velocity profile at the die exit was calculated at 1 mm intervals using conservation of mass from the measured profile of the extruded part and the profile of the die opening.
The LOICZ budget model relies on conservation of mass, a fundamental concept in the physical sciences.
This conservation of mass supports the assumption of degradation.
His studies of combustion laid the groundwork for the understanding of oxidation and reduction, two bases of chemical change; his emphasis on accurate weights and measures and his formulation of the principle of the conservation of mass began the era of quantitative chemistry; his researches in the analysis of plant and animal matter laid the foundation for organic chemistry; and his studies in fermentation and respiration were important contributions to modern biology.

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