conservation of matter

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Related to conservation of mass: law of conservation of mass

conservation of matter

(in physics) a law stating that matter can be neither created nor destroyed and that the amount of matter in the universe is finite. It is superseded by the special relativity equation e = mc2, but it is still applicable in the chemical process. Also called conservation of mass. See also conservation of energy.
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In comparison, COSMO solves the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations applied to a large numbers of differential cells in the vertical spaces.
By applying conservation of mass, as we approach the singularity of the big bang, the Universe would have been so dense that it is difficult to explain how gravity did not prevent the early Universe from collapsing.
The interface development and material distribution during the cavity filling can be accurately determined by enforcing the extra local mass conservation at each fluid subdomain, apart from the global conservation of mass at the whole cavity domain.
It should be noted that this modeling and simulation of the filling stage in two-component transfer molding are accomplished by adding an extra conservation law, satisfying the conservation of mass at the local flow sub-domains, to the existing set of equations that generally define the Hele-Shaw type flow in single-phase conventional injection molding process.
The conservation of mass approach has two primary disadvantages.
3" is incorporated to solve conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the processing of air distribution, and to analyze turbulence affection combined heat transfer on air distribution.
The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy for steady, creeping flow (very low Reynolds Number, inertialess) must be solved.
The most critical part of the hybrid numerical technique is to link the 2D and the 3D domains by proper conditions, such as the conservation of mass and the continuation of pressure variations.
Covers applications that include process economics, targeting for conservation of mass and energy, synthesis of innovative processes, retrofitting of existing systems, design and assessment of renewable energy systems, and in-process pollution prevention.
In addition, he emphasizes that the text is built on solid understanding of the principles of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, and conservation of momentum as the underpinnings of the subject.

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