consequentialism

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consequentialism

(kon″sĕ-kwen′shă-lizm)
The philosophical doctrine that the correctness of a choice is proven only by what that choice produces, rather than why the choice was made or what the agent intended or hoped might occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
This proposal is interesting, but it fails to justify partiality within a consequentialist framework because it does not explain the special normative significance of an agent's caring attitude for that agent.
In challenging the dominant consequentialist account, the book attempts to shift the very framing of the discourse by looking inside the conceptual structure of copyright doctrine, rather than to external considerations.
Within these debates on CE, it is striking to observe that very little is said about the merits of employing a consequentialist framework for assessing the ethical and moral status of different CE proposals.
2) Nor do I consider fairness accounts (which Huemer targets), except insofar as consequentialist accounts contain a fairness component.
The consequentialist argument typically focuses on the putative, perverse incentives created by the introduction of self-interested third parties in litigation, who are not themselves lawyers.
Cost-benefit analysis typifies the practical application of a consequentialist ethic where everything becomes commensurate and expressible in terms of a common monetary metric.
For example, some of the authors are engaged specifically with the tension between deontological rights and what is seemingly a consequentialist form of analysis.
Should such consequentialist reasoning always apply?
A consequentialist argument for a certain law is a moral rationale according to which the long-term outcomes for society with the law would be better than without it.
Like Corvino's, Gallagher's case is a mix of consequentialist arguments and appeals to marriage's symbolic social value, and her presentation is rigorous and engaging.
But, at the risk of turning our education system into a series of trading centers, it is important to provide a defense for why a traditional liberal arts education is important on epistemic and consequentialist grounds.
rights advocates into consequentialist debates about the utility of