consequentialism

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consequentialism

(kon″sĕ-kwen′shă-lizm)
The philosophical doctrine that the correctness of a choice is proven only by what that choice produces, rather than why the choice was made or what the agent intended or hoped might occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another rival theory, threshold deontology, asserts that consequentialist reasons can justify wartime killing and destruction.
229) If the resulting damages are sufficiently severe, a writer applying a purely consequentialist approach is likely to conclude that the IHL framework applies to such destructive hypothetical cyber actions.
I said above that Waldron offers a consequentialist argument that tries to make the best case it can in favor of hate speech laws.
theory is consequentialist in approach--a descendant of the utilitarian
However, despite the emphasis on moral duties, there is still a consequentialist ethic at the core of the model, as there must be in orthodox economics.
6) He takes this stricture, which he summarizes with the slogan "second-personal authority out, second-personal authority in," (7) to undermine most consequentialist accounts of moral responsibility.
Like Corvino's, Gallagher's case is a mix of consequentialist arguments and appeals to marriage's symbolic social value, and her presentation is rigorous and engaging.
An agent-centered virtue ethics is a type of consequentialist ethics.
The strain of liberalism that results is "committed to (1) a thick conception of economic liberty grounded mainly in consequentialist considerations, (2) a formal conception of equality that sees the outcome of free market exchanges as largely definitive of justice, and (3) a limited but important state role in tax-funded education and social service programs.
In dismissing consequentialism as an appropriate defense of free markets, Colombatto overlooks important work by free-market economists who provide a consequentialist ethical foundation for the market system.
Any ethical defense would have to be consequentialist in nature, yet such assignments also appear to fail the consequentialist test as well, which would require that the consequences be worthwhile and attainable in no other way.
Consequentialist rationales, at least as far back as Beccaria, Blackstone and Bentham, have offered primary organizing premises, and varying strategies, for all three projects.