consequentialism


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consequentialism

(kon″sĕ-kwen′shă-lizm)
The philosophical doctrine that the correctness of a choice is proven only by what that choice produces, rather than why the choice was made or what the agent intended or hoped might occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
Justice Breyer's consequentialism brings hope against judicial activism.
Second, consequentialism gives no direct weight to considerations of justice or fairness in the distribution of goods and harms (Scheffer 1998).
It is thus not surprising that a number of writers have claimed that consequentialism must be rejected because it requires the metrical commensuration of goods or instantiations that are usually incommensurable in value.
To take a more concrete example, consider the liberal consequentialism described in Part I.
For instance, Nozick's moral theory of property rights will not survive once it is analysed from the vantage point of consequentialism, which was first advertized by the utilitarian theory.
158) In short, consequentialism has some difficulty defending this basic feature of a core area of trademark doctrine.
For him, consequentialism is fundamentally incompatible with individualism and therefore with economic freedom and free markets because it requires choosing what ends should be pursued for the common good, which necessarily trumps individuals' judgments.
A longstanding debate within moral theory, and consequentialism especially, concerns the extent to which rightness depends on the agent's epistemic and other limitations.
However, it has recently been challenged by writers, such as Charles Goodman and Barbra Clayton, who argue that Buddhist ethics should be understood as a type of universalist consequentialism.
of Ottawa, Canada), this reader explores various issues of the ethics of war, guided thematically by the conflict between two broad moral frameworks for approaching the question: consequentialism (or utilitarianism), which focuses on the consequences that actions produce, and absolutism (or deontology), the view that some actions are wrong, absolutely, because they violate the fundamental rights of individuals.
defends in ethics is "virtuous consequentialism," which blends assessment of the consequences of action and policy with an Aristotelian emphasis on the importance of virtue for both moral action and moral decision.
It lies in what Sparrow describes as the "notoriously demanding nature of consequentialism.