consent

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consent

 [kon-sent´]
in law, voluntary agreement with an action proposed by another. Consent is an act of reason; the person giving consent must be of sufficient mental capacity and be in possession of all essential information in order to give valid consent. A person who is an infant, is mentally incompetent, or is under the influence of drugs is incapable of giving consent. Consent must also be free of coercion or fraud.
informed consent consent of a patient or other recipient of services based on the principles of autonomy and privacy; this has become the requirement at the center of morally valid decision making in health care and research. Seven criteria define informed consent: (1) competence to understand and to decide, (2) voluntary decision making, (3) disclosure of material information, (4) recommendation of a plan, (5) comprehension of terms (3) and (4), (6) decision in favor of a plan, and (7) authorization of the plan. A person gives informed consent only if all of these criteria are met. If all of the criteria are met except that the person rejects the plan, that person makes an informed refusal.

In nonemergency situations, written informed consent is generally required before many medical procedures, such as surgery, including biopsies, endoscopy, and radiographic procedures involving catheterization. The physician must explain to the patient the diagnosis, the nature of the procedure, including the risks involved and the chances of success, and the alternative methods of treatment that are available. Nurses or other members of the health care team may be involved in filling out the consent form and witnessing the signature of the patient or the parent or guardian, if the patient is a minor. In medical research, the patient must be informed that the procedure is experimental and that consent can be withdrawn at any time. In addition, the person signing the consent form must be informed of the risks and benefits of the experimental procedure and of alternative treatments.

consent

[kənsent′]
Etymology: L, consentire, to agree
to give approval, assent, or permission. A person must be of sufficient mental capacity and of the age at which he or she is legally recognized as competent to give consent (age of consent). See also informed consent.

consent

Agreement to an action based on knowledge of what the action involves and its likely consequences.

consent

Medtalk A voluntary yielding of a person's free will to another. See Informed consent, Presumed consent.

consent

The implicit or explicit agreement to medical or surgical treatment or physical examination. Civil rights against personal interference are retained, however, and anything done against a person's will may be deemed an assault in law.

consent

permission granted by an adult patient (or the parent/carer) for examination or treatment; the patient should be previously informed of the nature, risks and benefits of the proposed procedure and given opportunity to seek further information from the clinician or another source in order to grant permission to the procedure freely and without duress or persuasion; consent to treatment can be implied (i.e. patient has sought treatment), verbal (i.e. patient has listened to the explanation of indications, risks and benefits of proposed procedure and has given verbal consent) or in writing by the patient, who signs and keeps a copy of signed consent form (i.e. a written document delineating the nature, risks and benefits of the proposed procedure); a copy of the signed consent must be retained within the case notes; the exact age at which a non-adult patient (i.e. a patient aged <18 years of age) can give consent is not absolutely clear (see age of consent)
  • informed consent rational consent to a treatment based on the facts provided

consent 

A voluntary approval from a person to be examined, treated or subjected to any test undertaken upon them. Consent must be obtained prior to any such intervention.

consent,

n the concurrence of wills; permission.
consent, express,
n consent directly given by voice or in writing.
consent, implied,
n consent made evident by signs, actions, or facts, or by inaction or silence.

consent

in law, voluntary agreement with an action proposed by another, e.g. agreement to treat, to euthanatize. Consent is an act of reason so that the person consenting must be sane and of sufficient age to be capable of giving consent. Written consent is an agreement in writing.

informed consent
agreement to a proposition when the consenting person is in possession of all of the facts relevant to the decision. In the eyes of the law the consent of a client to a surgical operation, to a financial expenditure, to euthanasia carries no authority unless the client is fully informed about what is to be done and what the alternatives are. If this is not done the client is entitled to sue for damages if the outcome is unsatisfactory.
References in classic literature ?
Should it unhappily be necessary to appeal to these delicate truths for a justification for dispensing with the consent of particular States to a dissolution of the federal pact, will not the complaining parties find it a difficult task to answer the MULTIPLIED and IMPORTANT infractions with which they may be confronted?
No State shall, without the Consent of Congress, lay any Duty of Tonnage, keep Troops, or Ships of War in time of Peace, enter into any Agreement or Compact with another State, or with a foreign Power, or engage in War, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent Danger as will not admit of delay.
He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new States shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or Parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the Congress.
Done in Convention by the Unanimous Consent of the States present the Seventeenth Day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven and of the Independence of the United States of America the Twelfth In Witness whereof We have hereunto subscribed our Names,
Lastly, sir, I promise you I would not myself, for any consideration, no, not for the whole world, consent to marry this young lady, if I was not persuaded she had all the passion for me which I desire she should have.
if you had a much thought about making me easy as you have about making me rich, you would soon consent to it.
consider what it will be to marry a gentleman of a good family, in good circumstances, and with the consent of the whole house, and to enjoy all that he world can give you; and what, on the other hand, to be sunk into the dark circumstances of a woman that has lost her reputation; and that though I shall be a private friend to you while I live, yet as I shall be suspected always, so you will be afraid to see me, and I shall be afraid to own you.
This, and his persuasion, at length prevailed with me to consent, though with so much reluctance, that it was easy to see I should go to church like a bear to the stake.
I will not begin any future, even for you," said Maggie, tremulously, "with a deliberate consent to what ought not to have been.
It has never been my will to marry you; if you were to win consent from the momentary triumph of my feeling for you, you would not have my whole soul.
My whole soul has never consented; it does not consent now.