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conscious

 [kon´shus]
1. having awareness of oneself and of one's acts and surroundings.
2. a state of alertness or awareness characterized by response to external stimuli.
3. the part of the mind that is constantly within awareness, one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.

con·scious

(con'shŭs),
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts, and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual, as a conscious act or idea, distinguished from automatic or instinctive.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious

/con·scious/ (kon´shus)
1. having awareness of one's self, acts, and surroundings.
2. a state of alertness characterized by response to external stimuli.
3. in Freud's terminology, the part of the mind that is constantly within awareness.

conscious

(kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1.
a. Characterized by or having an awareness of one's environment and one's own existence, sensations, and thoughts.
b. Mentally perceptive or alert; awake: The patient remained fully conscious after the local anesthetic was administered.
2. Capable of thought, will, or perception: the development of conscious life on the planet.
3. Subjectively known or felt: conscious remorse.
4. Intentionally conceived or done; deliberate: a conscious insult; made a conscious effort to speak more clearly.
5. Inwardly attentive or sensitive to something: As he spoke, he became increasingly conscious of his high-pitched voice.
6. Showing awareness of or preoccupation with something. Often used in combination: a cost-conscious approach to health care; a value-conscious shopper.
n.
In psychoanalysis, the component of waking awareness perceptible by a person at any given instant; consciousness.

con′scious·ly adv.

conscious

[kon′shəs]
Etymology: L, conscire, to be aware
1 adj, (in neurology) capable of responding to sensory stimuli; awake, alert; aware of one's external environment.
2 n, (in psychiatry) that part of the psyche or mental functioning in which thoughts, ideas, emotions, and other mental content are in complete awareness. Compare preconscious, unconscious.

conscious

Neurology
adjective Awake, alert.

Psychiatry
noun The content of the mind or mental functioning of which one is aware.

adjective Referring or pertaining to the content of the mind or mental functioning of which one is aware; as in, a conscious decision.

conscious

adjective Neurology Awake, alert. See Conservatorship, Unconscious noun Psychiatry The content of mind or mental functioning of which one is aware.

con·scious

(kon'shŭs)
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual, as a conscious act or idea, distinguished from automatic or instinctive.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious

Awareness of one's existence, sensations, and environment. Capable of thought and perception.

con·scious

(kon'shŭs)
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts, and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious,

adj pertaining to the state of mind in which an individual is able to breathe on his or her own and to respond to verbal commands and physical prompts.

conscious

capable of responding to sensory stimuli; awake; aware.
References in periodicals archive ?
They have lived full lives, and yet every day they consciously choose to come here.
The person who has a `fat' self-image--whose self-image claims to have a `sweet tooth,' to be unable to resist `junk food,' who cannot find the time to exercise," Maltz posits as an example, "will be unable to lose weight and keep it off no matter what he tries to do consciously in opposition to that self-image.
Although this 'zine remains kinda self consciously nostalgic (an earlier issue featured an ode to rails, and in this one a 21 year-old smugly asserts he is "bid school") it's got some interesting stuff: Personal stories can be either great or painful to read, and Skatedork has both varieties.
Thank you for the inspiration, knowledge, and dedication you provide to those who wish to live consciously and kindly.
It is also a tale of a highly successful man who has, consciously or not, merely substituted one dominating father figure for another, the United States of America.
I could not manage without consciously and half-consciously lying,' writes Pomerants.
Nonetheless, Carnell said FDICIA differed from previous banking legislation because it consciously sought to change the incentives of the banks' owners, managers and regulators.
Thus tribal leaders, while imitating the lifestyle of the Roman elite, consciously avoided educating their children in Roman values and, before Clovis, embracing Christianity themselves.
It seems almost consciously intended for AMERICAN FORESTS members who need, now and then, to reflect on why we love forests and trees.
From the contractor's perspective, they probably have smaller crews and they must operate very efficiently and cost consciously, yet still be able to get the job done.
During the 1950s, while America was embracing the gray flannel suit, Ginsberg and Kerouac were consciously rebelling against the careerism of their contemporaries and trying to strip away the masks that hide us from others and from ourselves.
Because he grew into positions, he wasn't consciously aware of the networking and its value to him and the institution.