conscious


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Related to conscious: Conscious sedation

conscious

 [kon´shus]
1. having awareness of oneself and of one's acts and surroundings.
2. a state of alertness or awareness characterized by response to external stimuli.
3. the part of the mind that is constantly within awareness, one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.

con·scious

(con'shŭs),
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts, and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual, as a conscious act or idea, distinguished from automatic or instinctive.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious

/con·scious/ (kon´shus)
1. having awareness of one's self, acts, and surroundings.
2. a state of alertness characterized by response to external stimuli.
3. in Freud's terminology, the part of the mind that is constantly within awareness.

conscious

(kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1.
a. Characterized by or having an awareness of one's environment and one's own existence, sensations, and thoughts.
b. Mentally perceptive or alert; awake: The patient remained fully conscious after the local anesthetic was administered.
2. Capable of thought, will, or perception: the development of conscious life on the planet.
3. Subjectively known or felt: conscious remorse.
4. Intentionally conceived or done; deliberate: a conscious insult; made a conscious effort to speak more clearly.
5. Inwardly attentive or sensitive to something: As he spoke, he became increasingly conscious of his high-pitched voice.
6. Showing awareness of or preoccupation with something. Often used in combination: a cost-conscious approach to health care; a value-conscious shopper.
n.
In psychoanalysis, the component of waking awareness perceptible by a person at any given instant; consciousness.

con′scious·ly adv.

conscious

[kon′shəs]
Etymology: L, conscire, to be aware
1 adj, (in neurology) capable of responding to sensory stimuli; awake, alert; aware of one's external environment.
2 n, (in psychiatry) that part of the psyche or mental functioning in which thoughts, ideas, emotions, and other mental content are in complete awareness. Compare preconscious, unconscious.

conscious

Neurology
adjective Awake, alert.

Psychiatry
noun The content of the mind or mental functioning of which one is aware.

adjective Referring or pertaining to the content of the mind or mental functioning of which one is aware; as in, a conscious decision.

conscious

adjective Neurology Awake, alert. See Conservatorship, Unconscious noun Psychiatry The content of mind or mental functioning of which one is aware.

con·scious

(kon'shŭs)
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual, as a conscious act or idea, distinguished from automatic or instinctive.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious

Awareness of one's existence, sensations, and environment. Capable of thought and perception.

con·scious

(kon'shŭs)
1. Aware; having present knowledge or perception of oneself, one's acts, and surroundings.
2. Denoting something occurring with the perceptive attention of the individual.
[L. conscius, knowing]

conscious,

adj pertaining to the state of mind in which an individual is able to breathe on his or her own and to respond to verbal commands and physical prompts.

conscious

capable of responding to sensory stimuli; awake; aware.
References in classic literature ?
Probably the spectators are more conscious of the impressive meaning of it all than the brave young people themselves.
There were a few men still conscious, and to one of these I spoke.
I was conscious every moment in myself of many, very many elements absolutely opposite to that.
For three weeks, at least, her inward life had consisted of little else than living through in memory the looks and words Arthur had directed towards her--of little else than recalling the sensations with which she heard his voice outside the house, and saw him enter, and became conscious that his eyes were fixed on her, and then became conscious that a tall figure, looking down on her with eyes that seemed to touch her, was coming nearer in clothes of beautiful texture with an odour like that of a flower-garden borne on the evening breeze.
She did say this as plainly as a frank and flashing glance could, but in a moment the glow of her complexion, the radiance of her aspect, had subsided; if strongly conscious of her talents, she was equally conscious of her harassing defects, and the remembrance of these obliterated for a single second, now reviving with sudden force, at once subdued the too vivid characters in which her sense of her powers had been expressed.
And if you ask me again how far conscious all this was the nearest answer I can make you is this: that I remained on purpose, but I didn't know for what purpose I remained.
As to his head, he was conscious of nothing but a feeling of fullness -- of congestion.
Archer kept the talk from his own affairs, not with conscious intention but because he did not want to miss a word of her history; and leaning on the table, her chin resting on her clasped hands, she talked to him of the year and a half since they had met.
Richard Twining bubbled over with quaint absurdities, and George Road, conscious that he need not exhibit a brilliancy which was almost a by-word, opened his mouth only to put food into it.
And experiences of the same kind are necessary for the individual to become conscious of himself; but here there is the difference that, although everyone becomes equally conscious of his body as a separate and complete organism, everyone does not become equally conscious of himself as a complete and separate personality.
Every general and every soldier was conscious of his own insignificance, aware of being but a drop in that ocean of men, and yet at the same time was conscious of his strength as a part of that enormous whole.
When Ralph Denham entered the room and saw Katharine seated with her back to him, he was conscious of a change in the grade of the atmosphere such as a traveler meets with sometimes upon the roads, particularly after sunset, when, without warning, he runs from clammy chill to a hoard of unspent warmth in which the sweetness of hay and beanfield is cherished, as if the sun still shone although the moon is up.