consanguinity


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Related to consanguinity: amorousness, demureness, Consanguinity table

consanguinity

 [kon″sang-gwin´ĭ-te]
blood relationship; kinship. adj., adj consanguin´eous.

con·san·guin·i·ty

(kon'sang-gwin'i-tē),
Kinship because of common ancestry.
See also: relationship.
[L. consanguinitas, blood relationship]

consanguinity

/con·san·guin·i·ty/ (kon″sang-gwin´it-e) blood relationship; kinship.consanguin´eous

consanguinity

(kŏn′săn-gwĭn′ĭ-tē, -săng-)
n. pl. consanguini·ties
1. Relationship by blood or by a common ancestor.
2. A close affinity or connection.

consanguinity

[kon′sang·gwin′itē]
Etymology: L, con + sanguis, blood
a hereditary or "blood" relationship between persons that results from having a common parent or ancestor.

consanguinity

The state of belonging to an identical kinship or blood line.

Consanguinity and genetic defects 
Amish—Dwarfism, mental retardation and metabolic disorders seen in 1:250-500 births.

Armenians—Familial Mediterranean fever.
 
Ashkenazi Jews—Abetalipoproteinemia, Bloom syndrome, familial dysautonomia, factor XI deficiency, adult Gaucher’s disease, iminoglycinuria, Meckel syndrome, Niemann-Pick disease, pentosuria, spongy degeneration of brain, stub thumbs, Tay-Sachs disease, torsion dystonia (dystonia musculorum deformans).
 
Blacks—Haemoglobinopathies (HbS), sickle cell anemia, HbC, persistent HbF, alpha-thalassaemia, beta-thalassaemia, G6PD deficiency, adult lactase deficiency.

Canadians: French Quebec—Agenesis of corpus callosum, Morquio syndrome, tyrosinaemia; Nova Scotia—Niemann-Pick disease, type D.
 
Chinese—Beta-thalassaemia, G6PD deficiency, adult lactase deficiency.
 
Costa Rica—Malignant osteoporosis.
 
Eskimos (Inuit and Yupik people)—Adrenal hyperplasia, Kuskokwim disease, methaemoglobinamia, pseudocholinesterase deficiency.
 
Finns—Congenital nephrosis.
 
Irish/English—Neural tube defects.
 
Japanese—Acatalasia, dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria, Oguchi’s disease.
 
Lebanese—Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen syndrome, juvenile Tay-Sachs disease.
 
Mediterranean: Greek, Italian, Sephardic Jews—beta-thalassaemia, Mediterranean-type G6PD deficiency, familial Mediterranean fever, type-III glycogen storage disease
 
Norwegians—Cholestasis-lymphoedema.
 
South Africans—Variegate porphyria.

con·san·guin·i·ty

(kon'sang-gwin'i-tē)
Kinship because of common ancestry.
Synonym(s): blood relationship.
[L. consanguinitas, blood relationship]

consanguinity

Blood relationship. The term does not imply any particular degree of closeness and ranges from identical twin to remote cousin.

con·san·guin·i·ty

(kon'sang-gwin'i-tē)
Kinship because of common ancestry.
[L. consanguinitas, blood relationship]

consanguinity (kon´sangwin´itē),

n a hereditary or “blood” relationship between persons, by virtue of having a common parent or ancestor.

consanguinity

blood relationship; kinship.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those who are not qualified to run during elections are person related up to the second degree of consanguinity or affinity whether full or half blood, legitimate or illegitimate, to an incumbent elective official and two or more persons related to one another within the second degree of consanguinity or affinity cannot run simultaneously with each other in the same election, even if not related to an incumbent.
Julian Tonna, marketing director of Nutricia, said some metabolic disorders are rare but because of consanguinity [cousin marriages] in the region, it is high.
The doctor said the pre-marital tests only check for thalassemia beta-major, which is common because of consanguinity.
Consanguinity or marriage between close relatives is common in the UAE and in the sub-continent and can lead to genetic disorders in the children of such unions.
Secondarily, there is greater consanguinity, many cousin marriages and many generations recessive disorders have been uncovered," he said.
Muscat: A study conducted among patients with coronary heart disease in Muscat suggests that people with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and a family history of coronary heart disease, consanguinity and sedentary occupations are to be considered at high risk of developing the disease.
The table, however, further shows that the estimates (by consanguinity status and by urban/rural status) are at least partially influenced by the mean children born (so far) to those who at the time of the survey were less than 35 years of age, having obviously not yet completed their reproductive period.
Moreover, it is especially in the chapters on marriage and divorce that the weak social and legal position of Muslim women becomes poignantly clear: seemingly endless is the casuistry dealing with women just married or about to be married, with or without consummation, exposed to (in)definite repudiation, (not) being granted maintenance and/or domicile, inheriting or being disinherited, sharing a husband with an assortment of co-wives who just pass, or do not pass, foster-relationship or consanguinity screening, and so on.
For example, in the discussion of intestacy (Chapter 4) the author answers such questions as how intestate estates are divided among heirs, the rights of surviving spouses, how common law rules of consanguinity are applied, the legal rights of ommitted, divorced, or disinherited spouses, and the interpretation of the rules in community property vs.