consanguinity


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to consanguinity: amorousness, demureness, Consanguinity table

consanguinity

 [kon″sang-gwin´ĭ-te]
blood relationship; kinship. adj., adj consanguin´eous.

con·san·guin·i·ty

(kon'sang-gwin'i-tē),
Kinship because of common ancestry.
See also: relationship.
[L. consanguinitas, blood relationship]

consanguinity

/con·san·guin·i·ty/ (kon″sang-gwin´it-e) blood relationship; kinship.consanguin´eous

consanguinity

(kŏn′săn-gwĭn′ĭ-tē, -săng-)
n. pl. consanguini·ties
1. Relationship by blood or by a common ancestor.
2. A close affinity or connection.

consanguinity

[kon′sang·gwin′itē]
Etymology: L, con + sanguis, blood
a hereditary or "blood" relationship between persons that results from having a common parent or ancestor.

consanguinity

The state of belonging to an identical kinship or blood line.

Consanguinity and genetic defects 
Amish—Dwarfism, mental retardation and metabolic disorders seen in 1:250-500 births.

Armenians—Familial Mediterranean fever.
 
Ashkenazi Jews—Abetalipoproteinemia, Bloom syndrome, familial dysautonomia, factor XI deficiency, adult Gaucher’s disease, iminoglycinuria, Meckel syndrome, Niemann-Pick disease, pentosuria, spongy degeneration of brain, stub thumbs, Tay-Sachs disease, torsion dystonia (dystonia musculorum deformans).
 
Blacks—Haemoglobinopathies (HbS), sickle cell anemia, HbC, persistent HbF, alpha-thalassaemia, beta-thalassaemia, G6PD deficiency, adult lactase deficiency.

Canadians: French Quebec—Agenesis of corpus callosum, Morquio syndrome, tyrosinaemia; Nova Scotia—Niemann-Pick disease, type D.
 
Chinese—Beta-thalassaemia, G6PD deficiency, adult lactase deficiency.
 
Costa Rica—Malignant osteoporosis.
 
Eskimos (Inuit and Yupik people)—Adrenal hyperplasia, Kuskokwim disease, methaemoglobinamia, pseudocholinesterase deficiency.
 
Finns—Congenital nephrosis.
 
Irish/English—Neural tube defects.
 
Japanese—Acatalasia, dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria, Oguchi’s disease.
 
Lebanese—Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen syndrome, juvenile Tay-Sachs disease.
 
Mediterranean: Greek, Italian, Sephardic Jews—beta-thalassaemia, Mediterranean-type G6PD deficiency, familial Mediterranean fever, type-III glycogen storage disease
 
Norwegians—Cholestasis-lymphoedema.
 
South Africans—Variegate porphyria.

con·san·guin·i·ty

(kon'sang-gwin'i-tē)
Kinship because of common ancestry.
Synonym(s): blood relationship.
[L. consanguinitas, blood relationship]

consanguinity

Blood relationship. The term does not imply any particular degree of closeness and ranges from identical twin to remote cousin.

con·san·guin·i·ty

(kon'sang-gwin'i-tē)
Kinship because of common ancestry.
[L. consanguinitas, blood relationship]

consanguinity (kon´sangwin´itē),

n a hereditary or “blood” relationship between persons, by virtue of having a common parent or ancestor.

consanguinity

blood relationship; kinship.
References in periodicals archive ?
The perils of consanguinity are hardly recognised in Pakistan.
Causes of visual loss, numbers of consanguinity and family history in students attending to the school for students with visual impairment, in Ankara Etiology of visual impairment Patients, Consanguinity, Family n (%) n (%) history, n(%) Retinal dystrophies 29 (24.
Though the relationship between consanguinity and abuse did not always reach the level of statistical significance, it nonetheless underscores the importance of discerning practical significance, which in this case trumps the statistical significance.
Maternal consanguinity was the most commonly associated factor with genetic eye disorders.
All the probands studied were compared with respect to their parental education, occupation, religion, presence of consanguineous relationship in parents and degree of consanguinity and accordingly classification of probands was done.
Information on age, birth order, parity parental age, parental consanguinity, and family history of DS at presentation were documented using a questionnaire.
Frequency and percentage were calculated for qualitative variables like age, sex, family history, consanguinity, family income, type of BHS, triggering factor and compliance.
Keywords: Cancer, leukemia, consanguinity, hospital population, prevalence.
Demographic and clinical data such as age, sex, place of residence, consanguinity, diagnosis date, date of death (if applicable), blood group, type of RH, ferritin and hemoglobin level, blood transfusion, date of follow-up, kind of received blood (filtration, washed or unknown), and accompanied diseases were extracted from the medical records of patients.
In Pakistan and other Asian countries major cause of colour-blindness is inbreeding and consanguinity (cuisine marriages).