conoid


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Related to conoid: coronoid process, Conoid ligament, Conoid tubercle, Rhoptry, conoid tubercle of clavicle

co·noid

(kō'noyd),
1. A conic structure.
2. Part of the apical complex characteristic of the protozoan subphylum, Apicomplexa; seen in sporozoites, merozoites, or other developmental stages of sporozoans, less well developed in the piroplasms (families Babesiidae and Theileriidae). The function of the conoid is unknown, but it is thought to be an organelle of penetration into the host cell, possibly aided by a protrusible form of the conoid.
[G. kōnoeidēs, cone-shaped]

conoid

/co·noid/ (ko´noid) cone-shaped.

co·noid

(kō'noyd)
1. A cone-shaped structure.
2. Part of the apical complex characteristic of the protozoan subphylum Apicomplexa; seen in sporozoites, merozoites, or other developmental stages of sporozoans, less developed in the piroplasms (families Babesiidae and Theileriidae). The function of the conoid is unknown, but it is thought to be an organelle of penetration into the host cell, possibly aided by a protrusible form of the conoid.
[G. kōnoeidēs, cone-shaped]

conoid

(kō′noyd) [Gr. konos, cone, + eidos, form, shape]
Resembling a cone; conical.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the apex of the meeting of four conoids infill blocks lying almost flat to the geometric surface act as key stones to lock in the corbelled conoid form.
Because the cloister construction has to span between other existing structures and external buttresses around the cloister, the conoid pocket - that is the space behind the masonry shell - is left open to the void between the fan vault masonry and the lean-to roof above.
130) for the Dioskouroi twins and coins featuring their baetyl-like paired symbols, two conoid helmets (piloi), upon an altar.
The technique also recreates the vectors of both the conoid and trapezoid portions of the coracoclavicular ligaments.
Recent literature suggests that a true anatomic reconstruction, in an attempt to recreate the conoid and trapezoid ligaments, may offer an advantage in preventing both recurrent subluxation and anterior-posterior instability compared to a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure.
Male eyes convergent or contiguous below antennae; female face distinctly narrowed downwards; male postpedicel globular, reniform, conoid (Chrysotus) or with slender apical projection (Achradocera); male sternite 8 with simple hairs, rarely with short thick setae; surstylus and epandrial lobe broad; male cercus without distoventral projection 13
Male postpedicel globular, reniform or conoid with subapica1 arista-like stylus; lower postocular surface with fine unmodified setae Chrysotus Meigen, 1824