connective tissue


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Related to connective tissue: nervous tissue, Loose connective tissue, Muscle tissue, Connective tissue disease, connective tissue disorders

connective tissue

 [kō-nek´tiv]
a fibrous type of body tissue with varied functions; it supports and connects internal organs, forms bones and the walls of blood vessels, attaches muscles to bones, and replaces tissues of other types following injury. Connective tissue consists mainly of long fibers embedded in noncellular matter, the ground substance. The density of these fibers and the presence or absence of certain chemicals make some connective tissues soft and rubbery and others hard and rigid. Compared with most other kinds of tissue, connective tissue has few cells. The fibers contain a protein called collagen. Connective tissue can develop in any part of the body, and the body uses this ability to help repair or replace damaged areas. Scar tissue is the most common form of this substitute. See also collagen diseases.

con·nec·tive tis·sue

the physical or functional supporting tissue of the animal body, a major constituent of which (in addition to various kinds of cells) is an extracellular matrix of ground substance, protein fibers, and structural glycoproteins; it is derived from the mesenchyme, which in turn is derived mainly from mesoderm; the many kinds of connective tissue may be classified according to cell-matrix proportion (loose vs. dense), arrangement of fibers (regular dense vs. irregular dense), fiber type (collagenous, elastic), embedded cell type (adipose, lymphoid, hemopoietic), degree of differentiation (mesenchymal, mucous), location (subcutaneous, periosteal, perichondrial), appearance (areolar, granulation), or nature of matrix (cartilaginous, osseous, or, in the cases of blood and lymph, liquid).

connective tissue

n.
Tissue arising chiefly from the embryonic mesoderm that is characterized by a highly vascular matrix and includes collagenous, elastic, and reticular fibers, adipose tissue, cartilage, and bone. It forms the supporting and connecting structures of the body.

connective tissue

tissue that supports and binds other body tissue and parts. It derives from the mesoderm of the embryo and is dense, containing large numbers of cells and large amounts of intercellular material. The intercellular material is composed of fibers in a matrix or ground substance that may be liquid, gelatinous, or solid, such as in bone and cartilage. Connective tissue fibers may be collagenous or elastic. The matrix or ground material surrounding fibers and cells is a dynamic substance, susceptible to its own special diseases. Kinds of connective tissue are bone tissue, cartilage tissue, dense connective tissue, fibrous tissue, and loose connective tissue.

con·nec·tive tis·sue

(kŏ-nek'tiv tish'ū)
The supporting or framework tissue of the animal body, formed of fibers and ground substance with more or less numerous cells of various kinds. It is derived from the mesenchyme, and this in turn from the mesoderm. The varieties of connective tissue are: areolar or loose; adipose; dense, regular or irregular, white fibrous; elastic; mucous; lymphoid tissue; cartilage; and bone. Blood and lymph may be regarded as connective tissues, the ground substance of which is a liquid.
Synonym(s): interstitial tissue.
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CONNECTIVE TISSUES

connective tissue

Tissue that supports and connects other tissues and parts of the body. Connective tissue has comparatively few cells. Its bulk consists of intercellular substance or matrix, whose nature gives each type of connective tissue its particular properties. The vascular supply varies: cartilage, none; fibrous, poor; adipose, good; and bone, abundant. Connective tissue includes the following types: areolar, adipose, fibrous, elastic, reticular, cartilage, and bone. Blood may also be considered a connective tissue.
illustration
See also: tissue

connective tissue

Loose or dense collections of COLLAGEN fibres and many cells, in a liquid, gelatinous or solid medium. Connective tissue participates in the structure of organs or body tissue or binds them together. It includes cartilage, bone, tooth dentine and lymphoid tissue.

connective tissue

an animal tissue in which the intercellular matrix forms the major part. Such tissues fall into three main groups:
  1. ‘true’ connective tissue (ADIPOSE TISSUE, AREOLAR TISSUE, yellow elastic tissue (LIGAMENTS) and white fibrous tissue (TENDONS);
  2. skeletal tissue: BONE and CARTILAGE;
  3. blood, the last differing from the others in containing no fibres in the matrix (BLOOD PLASMA).

Connective tissue

Tissue that supports and binds other tissue; much of it occurs outside of cells (extra-cellular) and consists of fibrous webs of the polymers, elastin and collagen. Cutis laxa is associated with defects in these fibers.

connective tissue

; interstitial tissue tissue, of mesodermal origin, forming structural supporting frameworks, and made up of fibrous material in a liquid, semisolid or solid ground substance, e.g. musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, blood, areolar, adipose, fibrous, elastic, mucous, lymphatic and dermal tissues

connective tissue,

n structural tissue composed of fibrous materials and a substrate that contains a variety of cells. Bone, cartilage, hair, nails, and fibrous tissue between cells and around muscles are all considered types of connective tissue.
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Connective tissue.

con·nec·tive tis·sue

(kŏ-nek'tiv tish'ū)
Physical or functional supporting tissue of the animal body, a major constituent of which (in addition to various kinds of cells) is an extracellular matrix of ground substance, protein fibers, and structural glycoproteins; derived from the mesenchyme, which in turn is derived mainly from mesoderm.

connective tissue

a fibrous type of body tissue with varied functions. The connective tissue system supports and connects internal organs, forms bones and the walls of blood vessels, attaches muscles to bones, and replaces tissues of other types following injury.
Connective tissue consists mainly of long fibers embedded in noncellular matter, the ground substance. The density of these fibers and the presence or absence of certain chemicals make some connective tissues soft and rubbery and others hard and rigid. Compared with most other kinds of tissue, connective tissue has few cells. The fibers contain a protein called collagen.
Connective tissue can develop in any part of the body, and the body uses this ability to help repair or replace damaged areas. Scar tissue is the most common form of this substitute. See also collagen diseases.

elastic connective tissue
found especially in supportive tissues, e.g. some ligaments, and tendons, e.g. nuchal ligament or tunica flava.
reticular connective tissue
a type of connective tissue found principally in myeloid and lymphatic organs; they account for reticular meshwork.

Patient discussion about connective tissue

Q. My neighbor's kid had a lens dislocation due to Marfan's disease. Is this a contagious thing? My neighbor's have a sweet 8 year old boy. he had a lens dislocation due to a connective tissue disease named Marfan (I think that the name). It sounds like a very serious condition. My boy is playing with this kid several hour a week. should I take him to the GP to see that his is not infected with this marfan thing?

A. As in love and war so is in medicine the is no always nor never. It is probably the marfan that caused your neighbor kid the lens dislocation but you can never know for sure.
If you want there is nothing wrong in taking your boy for an annual check of an ophthalmologist.

More discussions about connective tissue
References in periodicals archive ?
Many connective tissue diseases feature similar and overlapping routes of damage, which may be the result of an immune system disorder and/or the weakening of collagen.
Marfan syndrome is caused by a defect (mutation) in the gene that determines the structure of fibrillin, a protein that is an important part of connective tissue.
Four focus groups met during the summer of 1999 and engaged in discussions about connective tissue injuries, lawsuits, insurance, and automobile accidents.
For example, a study of breast implants and connective tissue diseases, conducted at the Mayo Clinic, compared the medical records of 749 women with breast implants in Olmsted County, Minnesota, with a similar group of women from the same area who did not have implants.
s Advanced Connective Tissue Formula is a premium collagen nutritional supplement that supports skin and connective tissue health throughout the body.
Exagen also offers its newest panel, Avise SLE+ Connective Tissue, which is a comprehensive connective tissue disease diagnostic specifically created to help provide assistance with differential diagnosis of autoimmune diseases.
Kinder's team compared serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 67 patients with connective tissue disease-related ILD to vitamin D levels measured in 51 patients with other forms of ILD.
Grilley explains in the introductory lecture on his two-disc DVD set, Yin Yoga, that because connective tissue is yin (more static) compared to muscle (yang), yang muscle-strengthening exercises that involve movement and repetition are inappropriate for strengthening the less elastic fibers.
Microscopically, it is made up of an epithelial parenchyma that is embedded in a highly organized connective tissue stroma rich in nerves and sensory receptors (figure).
Some other connective tissue problems are not directly linked to mutations in tissue-building genes, although some people may be genetically predisposed to becoming affected.
This comprehensive approach will not only strengthen the muscles and connective tissue of the knee complex itself, but also the proximal and distal compartments that support it.
As they age, livestock develop more connective tissue binding the muscle fibers together.

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