congruence

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congruence

functionally normal bone orientation within a normal joint
References in periodicals archive ?
Human goodness, therefore, may be understood as the movement toward cosmic congruency, and goodness in human beings may be understood to indicate the rational goodness of the whole.
Due to the quasi-nonexistent of research on the congruency of projected and perceived tourism destination image of Vietnam, we propose to validate to our exploratory research to a comprehensive quantitative research while refining our study with a particular tourist attraction and a particular tourist segment for future research.
The leadership behavior congruency hypothesis was accepted if the interaction significantly increased the amount of variance explained.
Proposition 3: ESI reduces risk in new product development from supplier failures by creating goal congruency between the purchasing and supplier organizations.
Teachers mentioned that students constructing congruency proofs frequently select sides or angles that do not correspond to one another, or, in fact, do not even belong to the subject triangles.
s early commitment to the interweaving of grace and nature serves him well in the congruency he sees between natural law and ius gentium, uniting them especially through a shared vision of the common good.
This mind set is very important when you look at congruency.
Some excellent disciplines for achieving mind/body congruency are yoga, tai chi, and karate.
Solution: Because you wear strategy and operations hats, the responsibility to ensure congruency falls on your shoulders.
Harmonization implies congruency between cTnI systems for measurements performed in the biological matrix (patient serum) such that results are coincident throughout the measurement range.
Sometimes the congruency between image and theory works beautifully, as in the image of the 1901 "Literature" biscuit tin, which becomes the extended metaphor of the "empty biscuit tin," representing the Victorian book's transcendence of textuality into another realm of wholly material signification, and in the spectacular 1866 photograph of Haida artist Johnny-Kit-Elswa, whose culture is seen to be threatened by the looming cultural imperialism represented by the portrait of Dickens captured in the background of the photograph.