congenital syphilis


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con·gen·i·tal syph·i·lis

syphilis acquired by the fetus in utero, thus present at birth.

congenital syphilis

Etymology: L, congenitus, born with; Gk, syn, together, philein, to love
a form of syphilis acquired in utero, caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. Nearly 50% of infected infants die shortly before or after birth. It is generally characterized by osteitis, rashes, coryza, and wasting in the first months of life. Later childhood signs of the infection include interstitial keratitis, deafness, and notches in the incisor teeth (called Hutchinson's teeth). Some infected infants may appear disease-free at birth, but typical signs of the disease develop in adolescence. Infants are treated with penicillin; all infected infants require an ophthalmic examination. If untreated, the infection may cause deafness, blindness, crippling, or death.

congenital syphilis

Congenital lues, fetal syphilis Neonatology Transplacental infection with Treponema pallidum Clinical Early–hepatomegaly, irritability, FTT, fever, perioral and genital rash–condyloma lata, nasal discharge or snuffles and saddle nose; late–Hutchinson's teeth, saber shins, neurologic impairment, deafness, blindness Lab ↑ liver enzymes, anemia, monocytosis Diagnosis Serologic tests performed at birth may be negative. See Syphilis.

con·gen·i·tal syph·i·lis

(kŏn-jen'i-tăl sif'i-lis)
Syphilis acquired by the fetus in utero, thus present at birth.

congenital syphilis

SYPHILIS acquired by the fetus from the mother during pregnancy and present at birth. Congenital syphilis may feature severe early skin rashes, often occurring in the first 10 weeks of life, bone and cartilage defects, liver and kidney disturbances, damage to the corneas (interstitial keratitis), deafness, peg teeth, saddle-shaped nose and scars at the angles of the mouth. Treatment is with penicillin.

con·gen·i·tal syph·i·lis

(kŏn-jen'i-tăl sif'i-lis)
Syphilis acquired by the fetus in utero, thus present at birth.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2008, there were 431 cases of congenital syphilis (CS) reported to state and local health departments in the United States, according to the report, based on national surveillance data between 2003 and 2008 (MMWR 2010;14:413-7).
Examination of amniotic fluid in diagnosing congenital syphilis with fetal death.
Although Terpstra speculates that such mortality rates were likely due to congenital syphilis, the girls of the Pieta themselves, as Lucia Sandri has pointed out, had quite a different explanation: the extremely heavy workloads involved in making silk brocades and other products for the grand duke, and resulting catarrh and other symptoms, including blindness.
Syphilis: serious and fatal disease of the aorta, heart, and brain of the adult and death or congenital syphilis of the newborn baby.
Congenital syphilis may affect up to one million pregnancies a year in developing countries, yet this significant public health problem appears to have been forgotten.
Although tertiary or congenital syphilis can affect the inner ear and cause hearing loss, vertigo, and tinnitus, it rarely causes incapacitating tinnitus.
Categories of syphilis Acquired syphilis Primary Secondary Latent Late Congenital syphilis Early congenital Late congenital Table 2.
Most commonly acquired through sexual contact, syphilis is also transmitted vertically through the placenta to the fetus, resulting in congenital syphilis.
1 The incidence of congenital syphilis also declined dramatically from 1991 (107.
Some infants with congenital syphilis may have symptoms at birth, but most develop symptoms between two weeks and three months later.
Infection during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, prematurity, and transmission of congenital syphilis to the offspring.
In 2000, a total of 529 congenital syphilis cases were reported, for a rate of 13.

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