amaurosis

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amaurosis

 [am″aw-ro´sis]
loss of sight without apparent lesion of the eye, as from disease of the optic nerve, spine, or brain.
amaurosis conge´nita (amaurosis congenita of Leber) (congenital amaurosis) hereditary blindness occurring at or shortly after birth, associated with an atypical form of diffuse pigmentation and commonly with optic atrophy and attenuation of the retinal vessels.
amaurosis fu´gax sudden temporary or fleeting blindness.
Leber's congenital amaurosis amaurosis congenita.

am·au·ro·sis

(am-aw-rō'sis),
Blindness, especially that occurring without apparent change in the eye itself, as from a brain lesion.
[G. amauros, dark, obscure, + -osis, condition]

amaurosis

/am·au·ro·sis/ (am″aw-ro´sis) blindness, especially that occurring without apparent lesion of the eye.amaurot´ic
amaurosis conge´nita of Leber , congenital amaurosis a form of hereditary blindness, occurring at or shortly after birth, associated with an atypical form of diffuse pigmentation and commonly with optic atrophy and attenuation of the retinal vessels.

amaurosis

(ăm′ô-rō′sĭs)
n.
Total loss of vision, especially when occurring without pathological changes to the eye.

am′au·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.

amaurosis

[am′ôrō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, amauroein, to darken
blindness, especially lack of vision resulting from a systemic cause such as disease of the optic nerve or brain, diabetes, renal disease, acute gastritis, or systemic poisoning produced by excessive use of alcohol or tobacco, rather than from damage to the eye itself. Unilateral or, more rarely, bilateral amaurosis may follow an emotional shock and may continue for days or months. One kind of congenital amaurosis is transmitted as an autosomal-recessive trait. amaurotic, adj.

amaurosis

Blindness, see there.

am·au·ro·sis

(am'aw-rō'sis)
Blindness, especially that form occurring without apparent change in the eye itself, as from a brain lesion.
[G. amauros, dark, obscure, + -osis, condition]

amaurosis

An old-fashioned term for blindness. From the Greek amaurois , dark or obscure. See also AMAUROSIS FUGAX.

amaurosis 

1. Partial or total loss of sight due to a lesion somewhere in the visual pathway (usually the optic nerve), but not in the eye itself.
2. Synonym for blindness.

amaurosis

loss of sight without apparent lesion of the eye, as from disease of the optic nerve, spine or brain.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Company's most advanced programs in development are treatments for Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (Alpha-1) a disease causing a progressive loss of lung function, and Leber's Congenital Amaurosis, an inherited condition causing early blindness.
b) Retinal disorders = Leber's congenital amaurosis, rod cone dystrophy, and so forth.
The persistence of effect in Leber's congenital amaurosis - can it be explained?
16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Researchers from the University of Missouri and the 99 Lives Cat Genome Sequencing Initiative today announced groundbreaking discoveries of novel mutations in the cat genome found to correlate to two human eye diseases, retinitis pigmentosa and Leber's Congenital Amaurosis.
James added: "I have Leber's Congenital Amaurosis which means I have essentially no retinas so I have tunnel vision and can't see peripherally.
In sensory defect IN, the associations are numerous and include achromatopsia, albinism (ocular and oculocutaneous), aniridia, neonatal cataracts, congenital stationary night blindness, colobomata, optic nerve hypoplasia, early optic atrophy, cone dysfunction, isolated foveal hypoplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, and Leber's congenital amaurosis.
20-22 * Seventh Biannual Leber's Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) Family Conference.
The current research targeted Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a retinal disease that progresses to total blindness by adulthood.
Jessica, three, of Hindmarsh Drive, Ashington, was born with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), a rare genetic condition.
The Company's most advanced programs in development are treatments for Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, a disease causing a progressive loss of lung function, and Leber's congenital amaurosis, an inherited condition causing early blindness.
This progress builds on a breakthrough gene therapy human study for a rare retinal disease called Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), which restored significant vision to children and young adults including a boy who was able to put away his white cane and play baseball.
The discovery related to Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) pinpoints a gene called NMNAT1, which has never been associated with a human disease before, yet is present in every person.

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