conflict

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conflict

 [kon´flikt]
a mental struggle arising from the clash of incompatible or opposing impulses, wishes, drives, or external demands.
decisional conflict (specify) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state of uncertainty about the course of action to be taken when choice among competing actions involves risk, loss, or challenge to personal values.
extrapsychic conflict that between the self and the external environment.
intrapsychic conflict conflict between incompatible or opposing wishes, impulses, needs, thoughts, or demands within one's own mind.
parental role conflict a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as experience by a parent of role confusion and conflict in response to crisis. See also parenting.

con·flict

(kon'flikt),
Tension or stress experienced by an organism when satisfaction of a need, drive, motive, or wish is thwarted by the presence of other attractive or unattractive needs, drives, or motives.

conflict

/con·flict/ (kon´flikt) a mental struggle, often unconscious, arising from the clash of incompatible or opposing impulses, wishes, drives, or external demands.
extrapsychic conflict  that between the self and the external environment.
intrapsychic conflict  that between forces within the self.

conflict

(kŏn′flĭkt′)
n.
Psychology An emotional or mental disturbance resulting from the opposition or simultaneous functioning of mutually exclusive impulses, desires, or tendencies.
intr.v. (kən-flĭkt′) con·flicted, con·flicting, con·flicts
1. To be in or come into opposition; differ.
2. Archaic To engage in warfare.

con·flic′tion n.
con·flic′tive adj.
con·flic′tu·al (kən-flĭk′cho͞o-əl) adj.

conflict

[kon′flikt]
Etymology: L, conflictere, to strike together
1 a mental struggle, either conscious or unconscious, resulting from the simultaneous presence of opposing or incompatible thoughts, ideas, goals, or emotional forces, such as impulses, desires, or drives.
2 a painful state of consciousness caused by the arousal of such opposing forces and the inability to resolve them; a kind of stress found to a certain degree in every person.
3 (in psychoanalysis) the unconscious emotional struggle between the demands of the id and those of the ego and superego or between the demands of the ego and the restrictions imposed by society. Kinds of conflict include approach-approach conflict, approach-avoidance conflict, avoidance-avoidance conflict, extrapsychic conflict, and intrapsychic conflict.

conflict

Neurology See Visual-vestibular conflict Psychiatry A mental struggle that arises from the simultaneous operation of opposing impulses, drives, external–environmental or internal demands Types Intrapsychic–between forces within the personality; extrapsychic–between the self and the environment. See Approach-avoidance conflict Vox populi
1. Collision, clash. See Feto-maternal conflict.
2. War, battle. See Man-made disaster.

con·flict

(kon'flikt)
Tension or stress experienced by an organism when satisfaction of a need, drive, motive, or wish is thwarted by the presence of other attractive or unattractive needs, drives, or motives.

conflict

The effect of the presence of two mutually incompatible wishes or emotions. Unacceptably unpleasant conflict leads to REPRESSION and this may be manifested as NEUROSIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through an emphasis on both conflictive engagement and experimental process, Madrid's housing activists have been able to leave aside ideological differences to construct a common political project.
5) As Abensour says: "Democracy is not the accompaniment of a process that would entail the disappearance of the State in a smooth space without any rough edges, but rather the determinate institution of a conflictive space, of a space against, of a agonistic scene where two antagonistic logics face each other, where there develops a struggle without respite between the autonomization of the State as form and the life of the people as action" (Abensour 1998, 126, my translation).
The items, which appear closely related to "public shame" and were exemplified in the Introduction, seem not only to be strategies to avoid conflictive situations but also attempts to escape from another person's gaze.
In these senses, Cal represented the conflictive WRC type that does not endorse discrimination but may oppose efforts to combat or remediate its effects.
Fran's flighty nature, her widow's grief and her continued conflictive relationship with her grandmother propel her out of the farm house and into Calgary, without her three children.
Brincando el charco constitutes an important step in contemporary Puerto Rican cultural production that attempts to imagine Puerto Rico as a diverse, conflictive and contradictory community that, in addition, is not geographically bounded to the physical territory of the Caribbean island.
The Iranian power structures are complex and to an extent conflictive.
My discussion stems then from the belief that whereas so called "urban drama" (Howard 2002: 163-67) contributed to a conflictive debate on nascent capitalism, especially in its London (and most significant) location, plays about Islam and accounts by travellers, theologians and polemicists "created the representations that would define early modern Britain's image of the Muslims .
Women are caught in conflictive situations where their ability to function economically, psychologically and otherwise has to be weighed against the value of a potential child.
The need to establish clearly that "the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few or the one" (3) often puts an academic leader in a conflictive relationship with faculty.
Style: An open and educational format avoiding conflictive messages or themes (stressing non-religious, non political guidelines).
Yet, this good moment of the Jewish-government relationship turned into a very conflictive and bitter period for the local community as a consequence of the violation of the Argentine sovereignity during the kidnapping of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann.