conflict

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conflict

 [kon´flikt]
a mental struggle arising from the clash of incompatible or opposing impulses, wishes, drives, or external demands.
decisional conflict (specify) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state of uncertainty about the course of action to be taken when choice among competing actions involves risk, loss, or challenge to personal values.
extrapsychic conflict that between the self and the external environment.
intrapsychic conflict conflict between incompatible or opposing wishes, impulses, needs, thoughts, or demands within one's own mind.
parental role conflict a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as experience by a parent of role confusion and conflict in response to crisis. See also parenting.

con·flict

(kon'flikt),
Tension or stress experienced by an organism when satisfaction of a need, drive, motive, or wish is thwarted by the presence of other attractive or unattractive needs, drives, or motives.

conflict

/con·flict/ (kon´flikt) a mental struggle, often unconscious, arising from the clash of incompatible or opposing impulses, wishes, drives, or external demands.
extrapsychic conflict  that between the self and the external environment.
intrapsychic conflict  that between forces within the self.

conflict

(kŏn′flĭkt′)
n.
Psychology An emotional or mental disturbance resulting from the opposition or simultaneous functioning of mutually exclusive impulses, desires, or tendencies.
intr.v. (kən-flĭkt′) con·flicted, con·flicting, con·flicts
1. To be in or come into opposition; differ.
2. Archaic To engage in warfare.

con·flic′tion n.
con·flic′tive adj.
con·flic′tu·al (kən-flĭk′cho͞o-əl) adj.

conflict

[kon′flikt]
Etymology: L, conflictere, to strike together
1 a mental struggle, either conscious or unconscious, resulting from the simultaneous presence of opposing or incompatible thoughts, ideas, goals, or emotional forces, such as impulses, desires, or drives.
2 a painful state of consciousness caused by the arousal of such opposing forces and the inability to resolve them; a kind of stress found to a certain degree in every person.
3 (in psychoanalysis) the unconscious emotional struggle between the demands of the id and those of the ego and superego or between the demands of the ego and the restrictions imposed by society. Kinds of conflict include approach-approach conflict, approach-avoidance conflict, avoidance-avoidance conflict, extrapsychic conflict, and intrapsychic conflict.

conflict

Neurology See Visual-vestibular conflict Psychiatry A mental struggle that arises from the simultaneous operation of opposing impulses, drives, external–environmental or internal demands Types Intrapsychic–between forces within the personality; extrapsychic–between the self and the environment. See Approach-avoidance conflict Vox populi
1. Collision, clash. See Feto-maternal conflict.
2. War, battle. See Man-made disaster.

con·flict

(kon'flikt)
Tension or stress experienced by an organism when satisfaction of a need, drive, motive, or wish is thwarted by the presence of other attractive or unattractive needs, drives, or motives.

conflict

The effect of the presence of two mutually incompatible wishes or emotions. Unacceptably unpleasant conflict leads to REPRESSION and this may be manifested as NEUROSIS.
References in periodicals archive ?
The dynamics of incentive and conflict political dimensions in the transfer of knowledge and mutual learning agreements and the creation of competencies over the long term may coexist with other conflicting values.
Investments banks have conflicting economic interests.
Conflicting rules are a potent bar to multi-disciplinary firms.
There will be conflict between business results and following the General Business Principles Ethics, as Universals has no clear indication of how to choose between conflicting obligations or duties (Kok.
Potential conflicts arise from the interaction between firms, an advertising agency and a client includes both common and conflicting interests (Ellis and Johnson, 1993).
The four most highly requested ethical dilemmas by ILSPs for training included dilemma item numbers 1, 18, 19, and 20 with underlying themes of respecting consumer choice conflicting with maximizing consumer potential, safety, or financial security.
Second, they have to be unbiased and "neutral," placing the expertise and power of decision-making in the hands of the conflicting individuals or groups themselves.