confinement


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con·fine·ment

(kon-fīn'ment),
Lying-in; giving birth to a child.
[L. confine (ntr.), a boundary, confine, fr. con- + finis, boundary]

con·fine·ment

claustrophobia.

confinement

(kən-fīn′mənt)
n.
1. The act of confining or the state of being confined.
2. Lying-in.

confinement

[kənfīn′mənt]
Etymology: L, confinis, common boundary
1 a state of being held or restrained within a specific place in order to hinder or minimize activity.
2 the final phase of pregnancy, during which labor and childbirth occur. See also puerperium.

confinement

Obstetrics See EDC/EDL–expected date of confinement or expected date of labor.

con·fine·ment

(kŏn-fīn'mĕnt)
Lying-in; giving birth to a child.
[L. confine (ntr.), a boundary, confine, fr. con- + finis, boundary]

confinement

The period from the start of labour to the delivery of the afterbirth (placenta).

confinement

restriction of animals' movements so that they are not allowed to range freely and graze pasture but are confined either outdoors or indoors, with food brought to them. The degree of confinement varies from tie-stalls for cows and farrowing crates for sows, to lounging barns and feedlots for cattle.

total confinement
animals housed at all times; a common practice in some tropical countries where protection from the heat and humidity may be essential for high-producing livestock; labor and engineering services are costly production items.
References in periodicals archive ?
Five pregnant women incarcerated in Western Pennsylvania have sued after being placed in solitary confinement.
He has already spent 14 years in imprisonment, including the last three years in solitary confinement.
The violations do not only include solitary confinement, but also torture, lack of ventilation in prison cells, and several others.
If passed, it would limit the use of solitary confinement to situations in which a young person poses a serious and immediate threat of physical harm to himself or herself, or to others, and then only for periods of no more than three hours.
Announcing the new policy in an op-ed essay in The Washington Post, Obama wrote:"The United States is a nation of second chances, but the experience of solitary confinement too often undercuts that second chance.
The Delhi High Court today indicated that a warrant would be issued against the controversial godman Dikshit, the head of the university, who is under the scanner after several cases of sexual assault and forced confinement of minor girls were filed against him by two female devotees.
The attention of both the President of the United States and a Justice of the Supreme Court--on of the nation's most influential jurists--to an issue like solitary confinement is both striking and highly unusual.
Since I finished writing 23/7, California has implemented significant reforms to its long-term solitary confinement policies.
The Court can go back on the replacement or release if the minor does not comply, in bad faith, with the conditions of enforcement of the measure of daily assistance or the obligations imposed daily, ordering the execution of the unexecuted time left from the duration of the measure of confinement in an educational centre.
Free range, Confinement, Feather pecking, Aggression, Litter pecking.
Unfortunately, this is not the first court case brought forward against the use of solitary confinement in Canadian prisons.