confinement

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Related to confine: epitomize, confined area

con·fine·ment

(kon-fīn'ment),
Lying-in; giving birth to a child.
[L. confine (ntr.), a boundary, confine, fr. con- + finis, boundary]

con·fine·ment

claustrophobia.

confinement

(kən-fīn′mənt)
n.
1. The act of confining or the state of being confined.
2. Lying-in.

confinement

[kənfīn′mənt]
Etymology: L, confinis, common boundary
1 a state of being held or restrained within a specific place in order to hinder or minimize activity.
2 the final phase of pregnancy, during which labor and childbirth occur. See also puerperium.

confinement

Obstetrics See EDC/EDL–expected date of confinement or expected date of labor.

con·fine·ment

(kŏn-fīn'mĕnt)
Lying-in; giving birth to a child.
[L. confine (ntr.), a boundary, confine, fr. con- + finis, boundary]

confinement

The period from the start of labour to the delivery of the afterbirth (placenta).

confinement

restriction of animals' movements so that they are not allowed to range freely and graze pasture but are confined either outdoors or indoors, with food brought to them. The degree of confinement varies from tie-stalls for cows and farrowing crates for sows, to lounging barns and feedlots for cattle.

total confinement
animals housed at all times; a common practice in some tropical countries where protection from the heat and humidity may be essential for high-producing livestock; labor and engineering services are costly production items.
References in classic literature ?
For though every good author will confine himself within the bounds of probability, it is by no means necessary that his characters, or his incidents, should be trite, common, or vulgar; such as happen in every street, or in every house, or which may be met with in the home articles of a newspaper.
On the confines of its geographical range, a change of constitution with respect to climate would clearly be an advantage to our plant; but we have reason to believe that only a few plants or animals range so far, that they are destroyed by the rigour of the climate alone.
For decades, scientists interested in two-dimensional arrangements of electrons have built stacks of semiconductor materials--the sorts of structures ubiquitous in today's microcircuits--to confine the particles to the zone where two layers of a stack meet (SN: 12/18&25/04, p.
4) Even more effective than the whip in suturing the "racialized" subject to "a nigger's place," writing - the piece of paper in the white man's hand - arrests, fixes, and confines the black man and teaches him how to stay in "a [B]igger's place.
Isaac Newton, defining nature's forces in the stark confines of mathematical equations, spurned centuries of worship.
Confine Paintant alludes as well to the fragility of the ecosystem.
The Federal Bureau of Prisons reacted by converting Marion into a disciplinary institution to confine inmates considered escape risks or especially dangerous.
As John Ashbery said in a recent catalogue essay for the artist, "If there is allegory here it concerns the subtle and not necessarily antagonistic relations between life and the structures that both confine and support it, an allegory of how humanity interacts with the restrictions it has either stumbled on or erected to advance its business.
The Supreme Court ruled Monday that states may confine violent sex offenders in mental hospitals after they have served their criminal sentences, even if the offenders are not so mentally ill as to meet a state's ordinary criteria for civil commitment against their will.