configuration

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configuration

 [kon-fig″u-ra´shun]
1. the general form, shape, or appearance of an object.
2. in chemistry, the arrangement in space of the atoms of a molecule.

con·fig·u·ra·tion

(kon-fig'yū-rā'shŭn),
1. The general form of a body and its parts.
2. chemistry the spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule. The configuration of a compound (for example, a sugar) is the unique spatial arrangement of its atoms such that no other arrangement of these atoms is superimposable thereon with complete correspondence, regardless of changes in conformation (that is, twisting or rotation about single bonds); a change of configuration requires the breaking and rejoining of bonds, as in going from d to l configurations of sugars. Compare: conformation.

configuration

(kən-fĭg′yə-rā′shən)
n.
The arrangement of parts or elements in a pattern or form, as:
a. Chemistry The structural arrangement of atoms in a compound or molecule.
b. Computers The way in which a computer system or network is set up or connected.
c. Psychology Gestalt.

con·fig′u·ra′tion·al·ly adv.
con·fig′u·ra′tive, con·fig′u·ra′tion·al adj.

configuration

[kənfig′yərā′shən]
Etymology: L, configuare, to form from
the hardware, software, and peripherals assembled to work as a computer unit for a specific situation or purpose.

con·fig·u·ra·tion

(kŏn-fig'yūr-ā'shŭn)
1. The general form of a body and its parts.
2. chemistry The spatial arrangement of atoms in a molecule. The configuration of a compound (e.g., a sugar) is the unique spatial arrangement of its atoms, on which no other arrangement of these atoms can be superimposed with complete correspondence.
Compare: conformation

configuration

1. in anatomical terms the general form of a body.
2. in chemistry, the arrangement in space of the atoms of a molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Technologically, disavowing choice is to remain in the realm of older forms of media attached primarily to interpretive rather than configurative approaches to the experience of media texts.
In a search for configurative patterns across units, it can understandably become second nature to impute strategies, to resort to mathematics, to measure, and to draw on microeco nomics.
amp; HERMAN BELZ, THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION: ITS ORIGINS AND DEVELOPMENT xxii ("The constitution thus has a configurative effect.
A political career is a configurative whole, but separate careers are susceptible to theoretical analysis.
And Eckstein saw his configurative case study of Norway, as well as his investigations of Germany and Britain, not as validating his theory, but as platforms for illustrating some of its central general propositions (1975: 285).
It is indicative of the overlap between some of the strands of institutionalist writing that one could also assign Scharpf's work on the joint-decision trap to this category became of its explicit configurative comparisons with Germany.
Consequently, a key task of fundamental theology will be the ongoing "search for a configurative balance between faith and culture.
If one defines information as "the configurative, pictorial, or conceptual representation(5) of an empirical phenomenon possessing the potential of changing the action, intention or expectation of an entity in such a way that without this information the entity would act, intend or expect differently,"(6) then the following relations and notions emerge: 1.
Of the trilogy, Iser goes on to note, "In the configurative meanings of the game, the self is present insofar as it is a possibility of meaning, and the more variations of play there are, the more prominently will the basic self emerge, increasingly overshadowing its individual manifestations" (170).
Due to the complex needs of customers that require complex products of varying sizes, Greenheck manages an extremely configurative order environment using the SAPA Product Lifecycle Management (SAP PLM) application.