confidentiality


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confidentiality

 [kon-fĭ-den-she-al´ĭ-te]
a substantive rule in bioethics saying that the information a patient reveals to a health care provider is private and has limits on how and when it can be disclosed to a third party; usually the provider must obtain permission from the patient to make such a disclosure.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē),
The legally protected right afforded to (and duty required of) specifically designated health care professionals not to disclose information discerned or communicated during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality

/con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty/ (kon″fĭ-den″she-al´ĭ-te) the principle in medical ethics that the information a patient reveals to a health care provider is private and has limits on how and when it can be disclosed to a third party.

confidentiality

[kon′fiden′shē·al′itē]
1 the nondisclosure of information except to another authorized person.
2 (in research) protection of study participants such that an individual participant�s identity cannot be linked to the information provided to the researcher and is never publicly divulged.

confidentiality

Medspeak-UK
The non-disclosure of the private information of another. The state of data privacy, which is generally held under legal and ethical obligations of non-disclosure.

Patient privacy 
An implied agreement between a physician and a patient that all information related by the patient is to be held in the strictest of confidence, unless it is illegal and/or dangerous to society.

Psychiatry
The ethical principle that a physician may not reveal any information disclosed in the course of medical care, unless the patient who disclosed that information poses a threat to him/herself or others. Psychiatrists need a lower disclosure threshold, because they may see patients in their practice who are mentally volatile and potentially dangerous.

confidentiality

Psychiatry The ethical principle that a physician may not reveal any information disclosed in the course of medical care. See Anne Sexton, Bennett-Leahy bill, Doctor-patient relationship, Hippocratic Oath, Malpractice, Privilege, Privileged communication.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē)
The statutorily protected right and duty of health professionals not to disclose information acquired during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality

The principle which protects the right of patients to expect that details of their medical conditions should be divulged only to those who need to know them for medical purposes.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

(kon'fi-den-shē-al'i-tē)
The legally protected right afforded to (and duty required of) specifically designated health care professionals not to disclose information discerned or communicated during consultation with a patient.
[L. con-fido, to trust, be assured]

confidentiality,

n the nondisclosure of certain information except to another authorized person.

confidentiality

secrecy relating to information. All clinical data have a degree of confidentiality, the level varying with the information and the circumstances.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scope of the professional duty of confidentiality is much broader than that of the privilege.
Respected prime minister, you are lifting the confidentiality of the documents which serve your purposes and allow these documents to be released in your dailies.
The Ethical Standards for School Counselors (ASCA, 2004) further speaks to the dilemma of balancing students' need for confidentiality with parents' desire for information about their children in Section B.
Following further correspondence between the parties' solicitors, the defendant's solicitors, by Notice of Motion, sought court orders that the plaintiff waives his right of confidentiality and provide a written authority allowing Dr Sholler to discuss his management and treatment of Ankur, with representatives of the first defendant.
Florida also felt the debate's repercussions and responded by greatly broadening its narrow confidentiality protection for mediation.
In a representative survey of 419 primary health care providers in Lithuania, physicians gave their own guarantee of confidentiality for adolescents a high rating.
Because the need for confidentiality is the basis for the privilege, the presence of a third-party who is not a lawyer or a client during those communications may, as a threshold matter, negate the existence of the privilege.
To assure confidentiality, administrators did not hold a public question- and-answer period, instead allowing parents to approach the investigators after the meeting to ask questions individually.
THE Assembly's top civil servant last night sought to explain why the body apparently tried to impose a confidentiality clause on Charles Willie in clear breach of its own rules.
Search procedures and policies with varying degrees of confidentiality are essential (McLaughlin and Riesman, 1985), yet a newly formed committee will likely find itself in unfamiliar territory with unanticipated, if not threatening, confidentiality issues at the forefront.
There have been a lot of discussions on the camp nurse e-mail list about methods of documentation, including confidentiality, use of computers, use of forms, etc.

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