confession

(redirected from confess)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

confession

[kənfesh′ən]
an act of seeking expiation through another from guilt for a real or imagined transgression.

confession,

n in spiritual and psy-chological practice, a process of acknowledging, repenting, and seeking forgiveness for mistakes.

Patient discussion about confession

Q. How can I confess to my girlfriend that I am bipolar? Not that it really matters, since I cannot attract a woman to save my life, but I was wondering if there is ever a good time to say, "Hey, I am bipolar" and anticipate the reaction. As a bipolar man who is looking for some love and sex, how should I handle the topic, if at all?

A. Thanks JennJ. I think you're right about the group mentality. Thanks.

More discussions about confession
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Young Bohemian maid, you confess your participation in the feasts, witches' sabbaths, and witchcrafts of hell, with ghosts, hags, and vampires?
Why, you said you'd keep me here until I confessed," returned Anne wearily, "and so I decided to confess because I was bound to get to the picnic.
An I rack him to death and he confess not, it will peradventure show that he had indeed naught to confess -- ye will grant that that is sooth?
I confess, whether beautiful or plain,--not too plain,--women who earn their own living have a peculiar attraction for me.
Yet it was his duty to confess, to suffer public shame, and to make public atonement.
This is vague enough and slight enough, I must confess, but I must confess also that I had not even a conception of so much when I first read the "Inferno.
I confess," replied Elinor, "that every circumstance except ONE is in favour of their engagement; but that ONE is the total silence of both on the subject, and with me it almost outweighs every other.
At last, I fixed upon a resolution, for which it is probable I may incur some censure, and not unjustly; for I confess I owe the preserving of mine eyes, and consequently my liberty, to my own great rashness and want of experience; because, if I had then known the nature of princes and ministers, which I have since observed in many other courts, and their methods of treating criminals less obnoxious than myself, I should, with great alacrity and readiness, have submitted to so easy a punishment.
The traders halted at the sound of this language and the sight of the strange figure that uttered it, and from both figure and language at once guessed the craze of their owner; they wished, however, to learn quietly what was the object of this confession that was demanded of them, and one of them, who was rather fond of a joke and was very sharp-witted, said to him, "Sir Knight, we do not know who this good lady is that you speak of; show her to us, for, if she be of such beauty as you suggest, with all our hearts and without any pressure we will confess the truth that is on your part required of us.
But when I come to compare the miserable people of these countries with ours, their fabrics, their manner of living, their government, their religion, their wealth, and their glory, as some call it, I must confess that I scarcely think it worth my while to mention them here.
For myself, I confess that I can pity only Miss Mainwaring; who, coming to town, and putting herself to an expense in clothes which impoverished her for two years, on purpose to secure him, was defrauded of her due by a woman ten years older than herself.
She is now fifty years old (she confesses to thirty-seven), and her daughters, whom she has never been able to marry, are respectively twenty-seven and twenty-three(they confess to twenty and to seventeen).