conditioned stimulus


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Related to conditioned stimulus: unconditioned stimulus, stimulus generalization, classical conditioning, conditioned response, operant conditioning

stimulus

 [stim´u-lus] (L.)
any agent, act, or influence that produces functional or trophic reaction in a receptor or an irritable tissue.
conditioned stimulus a stimulus that acquires the ability to evoke a given response by repeatedly being linked with another stimulus that naturally evokes that response; see also conditioning.
depolarizing stimulus a stimulus that lowers the resting potential, making the inside of a fiber less negative. In cardiac fibers this means bringing the resting potential from −90 mV to −70 mV.
discriminative stimulus a stimulus associated with reinforcement, which exerts control over a given type of behavior; the subject must discriminate between closely related stimuli and respond positively only with this particular stimulus.
eliciting stimulus any stimulus, conditioned or unconditioned, that elicits a response.
threshold stimulus a stimulus that is just strong enough to elicit a response.
unconditioned stimulus any stimulus that naturally evokes a specific response; see also conditioning.

con·di·tioned stim·u·lus

1. a stimulus applied to one of the sense organs (for example, receptors of vision, hearing, touch) that are an essential and integral part of the neural mechanism underlying a conditioned reflex;
2. a neutral stimulus, when paired with the unconditioned stimulus in simultaneous presentation to an organism, capable of eliciting a given response.

conditioned stimulus

n. Psychology
A previously neutral stimulus that, after repeated association with an unconditioned stimulus, elicits the response effected by the unconditioned stimulus itself.

conditioned stimulus

Etymology: L, conditio + stimulus, goad
any stimulus to which a reflex response has been conditioned by previous training or experience.

con·di·tioned stim·u·lus

(kŏn-dish'ŭnd stim'yū-lŭs)
1. A stimulus applied to one of the sense organs that are an essential and integral part of the neural mechanism underlying a conditioned reflex.
2. A neutral stimulus, when paired with the unconditioned stimulus in simultaneous presentation to an organism, capable of eliciting a given response.
3. To improve one's physical state by exercise.

stimulus

pl. stimuli [L.] any agent, act, or influence that produces functional or trophic reaction in a receptor or an irritable tissue.

conditioned stimulus
a neutral object or event that is psychologically related to a naturally stimulating object or event and which causes a conditioned response. See also conditioning.
discriminative stimulus
a stimulus associated with reinforcement, which exerts control over a particular form of behavior; the subject discriminates between closely related stimuli and responds positively only in the presence of that stimulus.
eliciting stimulus
any stimulus, conditioned or unconditioned, which elicits a response.
stimulus generalization
in learning by animals stimuli tend to be grouped together, the reactions lacking the discrimination of the higher mammals.
stimulus response coupling
coupling of the neural or endocrine stimulus to the cellular response.
structured stimulus
a well-organized and unambiguous stimulus, the perception of which is influenced to a greater extent by the characteristics of the stimulus than by those of the perceiver.
threshold stimulus
a stimulus that is just strong enough to elicit a response.
unconditioned stimulus
any stimulus that is capable of eliciting an unconditioned response. See also conditioning.
unstructured stimulus
an unclear or ambiguous stimulus, the perception of which is influenced to a greater extent by the characteristics of the perceiver than by those of the stimulus.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, it may be that after some trials the conditioned stimulus does not arrive, or arrives more and more rarely, to the brain of the receiver.
The occurrence of it appears to depend on the nature of the conditioned stimulus.
2008) using a latent inhibition procedure, the present results show that swim stress can influence processing of the stimulus on trials in which a conditioned stimulus occurs but an unconditioned stimulus is not present.
Perhaps the largest body of evidence comes from studies showing that in a classical conditioning procedure, a conditioned stimulus (e.
Therefore, repeated, in-vivo, nonreinforced exposure to the conditioned stimulus to achieve extinction of the anxiety-related response functions became the preferred behavioral treatment for several anxiety disorders (Barlow, 2002).
the champagne becomes a conditioned stimulus for subsequent sexual pleasure) and traditional operant processes (i.
Rather than refer to this interference procedure as extinction-like, which implies both a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) and a traditional Pavlovian paradigm--features clearly absent in this type of learning--we use the term elemental interference instead.
Morphine as a conditioned stimulus in a conditioned emotional response paradigm.