concupiscence


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concupiscence

A theological term for ardent, usually sensual, longing or lust for an object, person or experience.

concupiscence

Horniness, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
18) This study draws on this rich research to examine one question, the influence of the association of concupiscence with female nature and disorder on lawmakers and civic courts.
Kelly explains: "In Augustine's vocabulary concupiscence stands, in a general way, for every inclination making man turn from God to find satisfaction in material things which are intrinsically evanescent" (364-365).
One has love of concupiscence for the good one wishes for the something that is other than the good (alteri), and love of friendship for that for which (illud cui) one wishes the good.
This in one form or another is the root of every concupiscence and, thus, of every sin and evil.
From the days of the early church, however, debate surrounded Mary's concupiscence or participation in original sin.
Isn't procreation the primary purpose of marriage and the remedy for concupiscence second?
Tillich uses three words to describe the marks of modern men and women alienated from God: concupiscence (lust), hubris (pride) and unfaith.
But it leads Simpson to see that Amans and Genius are simply two aspects of the same person, his concupiscence and his imagination.
Farr emphasizes that this was a campaign to reign in female sexuality, although there is no demonstration here that this in fact was the dominant trend of stoic literature, for he makes no mention of moralists' condemnation of male concupiscence.
He called it concupiscence, which was the desire of the self for the sell and where he felt it most of all was in sexuality.
However, the main difference between Protestant and Catholic doctrines was not the degree of human depravity - Catholic theologians differed in their positions on this question - it was whether concupiscence in the baptised constitutes |real and actual sin'.
s doxological language; iconography; and his experience of marriage and rearing children, especially regarding marital relationships beyond the categories of procreation and remedy for concupiscence.