concupiscence


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concupiscence

A theological term for ardent, usually sensual, longing or lust for an object, person or experience.

concupiscence

Horniness, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
When they appear in Beveridge's translation, they usually translate concupiscence.
From the context of Augustine's soteriology, concupiscence is the root cause of all subsequent sins.
Other stories of disordered marriages--the tyranny of an irresponsible husband which fails to break the fidelity of his forbearing wife (Clerk's Tale), a burlesque of the foolishness of excessive concupiscence in The Nun's Priest's Tale, and of the impotent carnality of the old knight Januarie in The Merchant's Tale, all deconstruct the conventions of "courtly love," literary or otherwise, as social folly.
The universality of concupiscence means that it is an original limit to the attainment of moral virtue for all--philosophers, believers, and those who are neither philosophers nor believers.
It is in the context of this spiritual struggle against concupiscence that we can best understand the disorder of covetous desires such as greed, avarice, and envy.
We teach, constantly, that sex education encourages concupiscence, instructs children to be interested in sex, and creates the opportunity for occasions of sin.
3) Further, concupiscence at least since Augustine of Hippo was associated with attributes considered feminine.
Another is that the Portuguese empire was uniquely characterised by miscegenation, a sign both of tolerance and concupiscence.
Necessarily linked with conversion and sin is concupiscence and "original sin," that state of infantile narcissism in which we are born, and out of which we are meant to be transfigured from self-centeredness to other-centeredness.
From the perspective of maturity, and from that of an intellectual Catholicism to which we shall turn shortly, Pinkterton's poem takes her father for a symbol of concupiscence, of insatiable bodily appetite in a fallen world.
One task for the next generation of theologians, so it seems to me, will be to show how the theology of the body integrates within the Church's more settled vocabulary of virtue, vice, concupiscence, and natural law.