concrete thinking


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con·crete think·'ing

thinking of objects or ideas as specific items rather than as an abstract representation of a more general concept, as contrasted with abstract thinking (for example, perceiving a chair and a table as individual useful items and not as members of the general class, furniture).

concrete thinking

a stage in the development of the cognitive thought processes in the child. During this phase thought becomes increasingly logical and coherent so that the child is able to classify, sort, order, and organize facts while still being incapable of generalizing or dealing in abstractions. Problem solving is accomplished in a concrete, systematic fashion based on what is perceived, keeping to the literal meaning of words, as in applying the word horse to a particular animal and not to horses in general. In Piaget's classification this stage occurs between 7 and 11 years of age, is preceded by syncretic thinking, and is followed by abstract thinking. Compare abstract thinking, syncretic thinking.
Thought derived from the senses, which reflects experience rather than abstract reasoning. Persistence or reappearance of concrete thinking in adults is abnormal and seen in those who are unable to generalise, linked to primary or developmental defects, or it may develop secondary to organic brain disease or schizophrenia

concrete thinking

Psychiatry Cognition that reflects experience, rather than abstraction, typical of those who are unable to generalize

con·crete think·ing

(kŏn-krēt' thingk'ing)
Consideration of objects or ideas as specific items rather than as an abstract representation of a more general concept, as contrasted with abstract thinking (e.g., perceiving a chair and a table as individual useful items and not as members of the general class, furniture).
References in periodicals archive ?
But in childhood we not only learn the concrete thinking of our ancestors, but also we inadvertently learn many cognitive and semantic inaccuracies, faulty assumptions, and culturally biased misperceptions handed down from generations of uninformed and frequently uneducated elders.
A majority of students still demonstrate characteristics that correspond to a concrete thinking level rather than use formal-reasoning principles that Piaget ascribed to adult thinkers" (de Sanchez, 1995, p.
But we learned that concrete thinking doesn't work well in a hurricane.