concrete


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concrete

(kŏn′krēt) (kŏn-krēt′) [L. concretus, solid]
Condensed, hardened, or solidified.

concrete (kängˑ·krētˈ),

n solid or semi-solid plant extract obtained by washing with an organic solvent, such as hexane. It has a fatty or waxy consistency and comprises pigments, wax, and essential oils.

concrete

mixture of cement and reinforcing gravel or stones used in the surfacing of yards, passageways, milking parlors and the like; critical to the good condition of feet and hooves of farm livestock. Excessive wear due to a too-abrasive surface causes footrot of pigs and epidemic lameness in dairy herds.
References in classic literature ?
Again he commenced his groping advance; but this time he had gone but a short distance when he emerged into a room, which was lighted through an opening in the ceiling, from which a flight of concrete steps led downward to the floor of the chamber.
The floor of the chamber was of concrete, the walls of smooth granite, upon which strange figures of men and beasts were carved.
He was as cold as the concrete floor, as methodical as a machine; and in such fashion he went about the washing, scrubbing, and disinfecting of Michael.
Outside, we knocked the necks of the bottles off against the concrete curbs, and drank.
You see, labor has nothing concrete of which to be despoiled.
Marilla was not to be drawn from the safe concrete into dubious paths of the abstract.
The common logic says 'the greater the extension, the less the comprehension,' and we may put the same thought in another way and say of abstract or general ideas, that the greater the abstraction of them, the less are they capable of being applied to particular and concrete natures.
Duty in the abstract is one thing; duty in the concrete is quite another, especially when the doer is confronted by a woman's stricken eyes.
Sometimes, however, as in a lyric poem, the effect intended may be the rendering or creation of a mood, such as that of happy content, and in that case the poem may not have an easily expressible concrete theme.
And this use of examples or images, though truly Socratic in origin, is enlarged by the genius of Plato into the form of an allegory or parable, which embodies in the concrete what has been already described, or is about to be described, in the abstract.
We must have a concrete idea of anything, even if it be an imaginary idea, before we can comprehend it.
Make it concrete, to the point, with snap and go and life, crisp and crackling and interesting--tumble?