model

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model

 [mod´'l]
1. something that represents or simulates something else; a replica.
2. a reasonable facsimile of the body or any of its parts; used for demonstration and teaching purposes.
3. to initiate another's behavior; see modeling.
4. a hypothesis or theory.
5. in nursing theory, an abstract conceptual framework used to organize knowledge and serve as a guide for observation and interpretation; see also conceptual model.
articulation m's a process of educational mobility in which programs work together to enable students to progress between levels of nursing education programs with the fewest possible barriers and repetitions of content.
conceptual model see conceptual model.
PLISSIT model a progressive design of sexual counseling that contains the four steps of permission, limited information, specific suggestions, and intensive therapy.

mod·el

(mod'ĕl),
1. A representation of something, often idealized or modified to make it conceptually easier to understand.
2. Something to be imitated.
3. In dentistry, a cast.
4. A mathematic representation of a particular phenomenon.
5. An animal that is used to mimic a pathologic condition.
[It. midello, fr. L. modus, measure, standard]

model

/mod·el/ (mod´'l)
1. something that represents or simulates something else.
2. a reasonable facsimile of the body or any of its parts.
3. cast (2).
4. to imitate another's behavior.
5. an hypothesis or theory.

model

(mŏd′l)
n.
1. A small object, usually built to scale, that represents in detail another, often larger object.
2. A schematic description or representation of something, especially a system or phenomenon, that accounts for its properties and is used to study its characteristics: a model of generative grammar; a model of an atom; an economic model.
adj.
Being, serving as, or used as a model.
v. mod·eled, mod·eling, mod·els also mod·elled or mod·elling
v.tr.
1. To make or construct a descriptive or representational model of: computer programs that model climate change.
2. Psychology
a. To exhibit (a behavior) in such a way as to promote the establishment of similar patterns of behavior in another: The therapist modeled socially appropriate conversation.
b. To repeat (a behavior observed in another): The child was modeling her mother's nurturing behavior.
v.intr.
To make a model.

mod′el·er n.

model

[mod′əl]
Etymology: L, modulus, small measure
(in nursing research) a symbolic representation of the interrelations exhibited by a phenomenon within a system or a process. The model is presented as a conceptual framework or a theory that explains a phenomenon and allows predictions to be made about a patient or a process. A model is analogous to an equation in mathematics. Nursing models usually describe person, environment, health, and nursing.

model

EBM
A formal framework for representing and analysing a process (e.g.,  a clinical trial) or data relevant to a process.

model

A conceptual representation of a thing or concept. See Acucare model, Age-structured model, Animal model, Biopsychosocial model, Brownian rachet model, Civil defense model, Coalescence model, Compartment model, Component object model, Conceptual model, Conflagration model, Coronary Heart Disease Policy model, Danger model, David Eddy cervical cancer model, Demand model, Deterministic model, Discrete time model, Disney model, Effector inhibition model, Emergency Medical Services model, Event model, Extrapolation model, Five factor model, Fixed effects model, Failure rate model, Frailty model, Framework model, Group model, Hebbian model, HMO model, Hobson model, Homo economicus model, Independent Practice Association model, K Mart model, Kirk model, Linear model, Mathematical model, Mouse model, MPM–mortalities probability model, Needs model, Open access model, Partnership model, Point-of-service model, Prediction model, Prevalence model, Process model, Pyramid model, Radial unit model, Remodeling model, Risk adjustment model, RITARD model, Scissors grip model, SEIR model, Self-nonself model, Sinclair swine model, Sliding filament model, Staff model, Supply model, Three-tiered model, Two-tiered model.

mod·el

(mod'ěl)
1. A representation of something, often idealized or modified to make it conceptually easier to understand.
2. Something to be imitated.
3. dentistry A cast.
4. A mathematical representation of a particular phenomenon.
5. An animal that is used to mimic a pathologic condition.
[It. midello, fr. L. modus, measure, standard]

model

in the context of scientfic methodology, a simplified representation of a more complex reality. In physiology and related disciplines, the term may be applied to a physical model (e.g. an animal preparation); more widely throughout science it indicates a mental or formal (e.g. mathematical) representation. A good model of either sort enables clear and, ideally, quantitative predictions to be made; testing these predictions will thus provide evidence as to whether the simplified concepts embodied in the model sufficiently approximate the real-world system. See also falsificationism, verificationism.

model,

n 1. a concept that represents how things work together. Used to explain how theories and observations fit together, such as an explanatory model.
2. a method for testing a specific theory that can be used repeatedly for examining dimensions and validity of that theory (e.g., a laboratory model).
model of biofeedback, drug,
n a scientific framework used in biofeedback research; attempts to remove purported placebo effects. Thus the effect of biofeedback is isolated and measured by removing the other varia-bles. Once used in early biofeedback results, this model is now considered to be inappropriate because it assumes the particular effects are derived from the instrument being used rather than from the subject.
model of consciousness, nonlocal,
n in mental healing, the notion that at some level, all minds are united as one; therefore the patient and the healer are not separated by distance.
model of TT, Krieger/Kunz,
n.pr See method, Krieger/Kunz.
model, biomedical,
n theoretical and epistimelogical basis of conventional Western medicine.
model, bio-psycho-social-spiritual (bīˈ·ō-sīˈ·kō-sōˈ·shl-spiˑ·ri·chōō·l mˑ·dl),
n in holistic nursing, a model in which persons comprise four interrelated components—biologic, psychologic, sociologic, and spiritual—that provide holistic and comprehensive understanding of the functionality of human beings and establish a diagnosis. The biological component refers to the fundamental needs that assist an individual with maintaining his or her health. These include sleep, food, water, fresh air, exercise, and a healthy environment. The psychologic component refers to perception, language, mood, cognition, symbolic images, thoughts, intellect, memory, and capability to evaluate information. The sociologic component refers to relationships or associations with friends, family, community universe, and relationship with the self. The spiritual component refers to a broad definition of one's purpose in life, meaning, and value. It also refers to traits associated with love, caring, wisdom, honesty, and imagination. It may also refer to indications of a guiding spirit, higher existence, or higher being of power. This model guides holistic clinical nursing education, research, and practice.
model, cognitive-behavioral medicine,
n in behavioral medicine, a system of thought in which the association between cognitive processes, stressful life events, behavior, and physiologic and emotional reactions is used.
model, eclectic (of music therapy) (e·klekˑ·tik mˑ·dl v myōōˑ·sik theˑ·r·pē),
n recognition that while music therapy is applied with several techniques and approaches, music itself is a powerful shared phenomenon and that its influence on human beings is important.
model, health belief,
n.pr a description of how complex interactions between cultural beliefs, personal idiosyncrasies, past experiences with illness, and previous interactions with doctors and other health professionals inform choices regarding possible health problems.
model, high-risk model of threat perception,
n a framework developed by Ian Wickramasekera, PhD; proposes an interaction between a set of predisposers such as low and high hypnotic ability, triggers such as significant life change, and buffers such as coping skills or support system, which can affect the risk of an individual developing stress-related disorders. Also called
HRMTP.
model, holistic,
n an etiologic model in which the reactions of the patient to etiological influences and agents are examined and the treatment serves to restore homeostatic balance, improve resistance, and stimulate self-healing. For instance, a patient with indications of a headache may be prescribed acupuncture therapy to restore qi balance, or a homeopathic remedy to reestablish an autoregulatory process within the body. Treatment is not directed toward the specific case. See also qi.
model, infomedical,
n a medical framework, contrasted to the biomedical model, that recognizes the self-organizing complexity of the human organism and emphasizes the role of multiple sources of information (e.g., body, mind, society) in the healing process.
model, mastery (masˑ·t·rē mˑ·dl),
n a framework used in biofeedback therapy; provides a fundamental structure for actively learning and mastering a necessary skill. Mastery of a necessary skill is considered indication of a successful outcome.
model, Nagi (näˑ·gē mäˑ·dl),
n.pr developed by SZ Nagi, according to which disability is viewed as a function of the interactions between an individual and the environment (encompassing the natural environment, culture, the economic system, the political system, and psychological factors) and not as an inherent state.
model, nonmaterialist (nnˈ·m·tēˑ·rē··list mˑ·dl),
n.pl model according to which the mind (soul, spirit), comes first and animates the physical body.
model, operant conditioning (ˑ·per·nt kun·diˈ·sh·ning mˈ·dl),
n a scientific framework used in biofeedback research, which assumes that rewards control behavior. In this framework, information received from the feedback is synonymous with a reward. Once used in early biofeedback results, the use of this model is now considered to be inappropriate because of the failure of the researchers to facilitate the act of self-control within the participants being studied.
model, Pressurestat,
n a model according to which the craniosacral system is similar to a hydraulic and semi-closed system that rhythmically filters cerebrospinal fluid from the blood, circulates it, and returns it to the bloodstream in a constant flow.
model, specific cause,
n an etiological model in which the prominent pathway of a specific condition is identified, and treatment is targeted so as to interfere with this pathway. For instance, a practitioner may trace the cause of chronic headache to a vasospasm and the treatment—medicine or biofeedback—is prescribed to directly interfere with the effects of the vasospasm.
model, stress-diathesis (stresˈ-dī·aˑ·th·sis mˑ·dl),
n a psychological paradigm that explains psychopathology in terms of the interaction between stressors and a patient's predisposition to mental illness.
model, systems,
n an etiologic model in which the web of influences that contribute to a specific condition as well as their associations with covert problems and risks is identified, and treatment is targeted to the foremost factors. For instance, a patient with symptoms of chronic headache and other minor indications of borderline hypertension, insomnia, and fatigue is prescribed behavioral therapy and changes in lifestyle that address exercise, diet, substance issue, and relaxation skills.
models, materialist,
n.pl theories about the development of illness that hold that the physical body is primary and that the body gives rise to nonphysical elements such as the mind and emotions. See also models, nonmaterialist.

mod·el

(mod'ěl)
1. In dentistry, a cast.
2. A representation of something.
[It. midello, fr. L. modus, measure, standard]

model,

n 1. a replica, usually in miniature
n 2. a positive replica of the dentition and surrounding or adjoining structures used as a diagnostic aid and base for construction of orthodontic and prosthetic appliances. See also cast.
model, casting,
model, implant,
model, of prepared cavity,
n See die.
model, study,

model

a simulation, a copy, occurring naturally or manufactured. Models used in statistical and epidemiological studies may be deterministic, stochastic or random.

model 1
the fixed version of the linear additive model used in linear regression analysis.
model 2
the random version of the linear additive model used in linear regression analysis.
animal model
any condition in an animal that has enough similarities to a condition in humans that studies of the animal disease are will assist in understanding the human disorder.
causal model
a model used to determine the part played by multiple factors in the cause or causes of disease; a path model in which the variables are arranged temporally.
descriptive model
consist largely of diagrams and maps or charts designed to describe a real-world system.
deterministic model
see epidemiological model (below).
epidemiological model
a mathematical model, which may be a computer simulation model, of a disease for the purpose of studying the behavior of the disease in a variable animal population under variable conditions of climate, density of population, mix of population, and so on. It may be an analytical model, an economic decision making model, an explanatory model or a predictive model. It may also be a causal model, which allows the operator to vary the determinants of prevalence and observe the respective outcomes. It may permit only the use of fixed numbers so that it will always return the same answer to the same question, in which case it is a deterministic model, or it may introduce the element of chance into the selection of outcomes, in which case it is a stochastic model.
Specific computer simulation models have been prepared for the study of rinderpest, the costs of mastitis control, the cost-benefits of foot-and-mouth disease control, and the costs of mortality in dairy calves. For example see reed-frost model.
linear programming model
a statistical model of a dependent variable, e.g. Y, as a linear combination of other variables, e.g. X. The model is based on a series of linear equations with a linear equation, called the objective function, as the desired end. Such an end could, in the determination of lowest cost rations, be the total cost of each ration.
mathematical model
a representation of a system, process or relationship in a mathematical form; see also mathematical modeling.
physical model
e.g. a model of a molecule utilizing colored balls connected by rigid wires.
probabilistic model
includes basic concepts of probability theory and may be deterministic or stochastic.
Reed-Frost model
a deterministic probability model of a theoretical epidemic.
stochastic model
see epidemiological model.
symbolic model
mathematical symbols used to describe the status of variables at a given time and to define the manner in which they change and interact.

Patient discussion about model

Q. how can models function without eating? whenever I skip lunch I find that I am not feeling well by the afternoon, and according to a magazine I read they basically live on ice(!), diet coke, champaign and cigarettes…

A. Champaign (as all alcoholic drinks) actually contains a significant amount of calories... :-) No one can function with out eating AT ALL, but they do get more used to eating LESS, and their body adjust itself (i.e. uses the food more efficiently) - it's harmful and may damage them in the short and long term, but it's possible.

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