concentric hypertrophy


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to concentric hypertrophy: eccentric hypertrophy

con·cen·tric hy·per·tro·phy

thickening of the walls of the heart or any cavity with apparent diminution of the capacity of the cavity.

concentric hypertrophy

Etymology: L, con + centrum, center; Gk, hyper, excessive, trophe, nourishment
a type of tissue overgrowth in which the walls of an organ continue to increase but the exterior size remains the same and the internal size diminishes.

con·cen·tric hy·per·tro·phy

(kŏn-sen'trik hī-pĕr'trō-fē)
Thickening of the walls of the heart or any cavity with apparent diminution of the capacity of the cavity.

concentric hypertrophy

Hypertrophy in which the walls of an organ become thickened without enlargement but with diminished capacity.
See also: hypertrophy
References in periodicals archive ?
LV adaption to arterial hypertension results in LV geometry responses such as concentric remodeling or concentric hypertrophy.
In an experimental model, chronic exposure of mice to 100 ppb sodium arsenite for 22 weeks increased both SBP and DBP, and 43% of LVM displayed a concentric hypertrophy pattern (Sanchez-Soria et al.
We used these parameters to appreciate the LV geometry as normal, concentric remodeling, concentric hypertrophy or eccentric hypertrophy as follows:
Based on the criteria set out above, we defined the LV geometry as normal, concentric remodeling, concentric hypertrophy or eccentric hypertrophy.
The prevalence of concentric hypertrophy is more than 10 times higher in the hypertensives group compared to normotensives group (34.
5%) have concentric hypertrophy and more than a half (62%) have an increased LV mass.
The most common form of adaptive geometry to high BP, we found to be the concentric hypertrophy, that was diagnosed by echocardiography in about one-third (34.
Structural modifications (perivascular fibrosis and collagen deposition in the interstitium), correlated with geometrical changes, especially the concentric hypertrophy, are responsible for the subclinical dysfunction associated to the LV hypertrophy.
The left and right ventricles appeared to have concentric hypertrophy with multiple, prominent myocardial trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses communicating with the main ventricular cavity (Fig.