concentric contraction


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contraction

 [kon-trak´shun]
a drawing together; a shortening or shrinkage.
Braxton Hicks c's see braxton hicks contractions.
carpopedal contraction the condition resulting from chronic shortening of the muscles of the upper and lower limbs including the fingers and toes, seen in tetany.
concentric contraction contraction resulting in shortening of a muscle, used to perform positive work or to accelerate a body part. It is metabolically more demanding than an eccentric contraction. Called also shortening contraction.
Dupuytren's contraction Dupuytren's contracture.
eccentric contraction contraction in the presence of a resistive force that results in elongation of a muscle, used to perform negative work or to decelerate a body part. It is less metabolically demanding than a concentric contraction but may cause disruption of associated connective tissue with delayed soreness or frank injury if it occurs in an unaccustomed manner. Called also lengthening contraction.
end-diastolic premature ventricular contraction a ventricular ectopic beat falling at the end of diastole; it may or may not be slightly premature and may or may not be a fusion beat.
haustral c's muscular contractions of the wall of the large intestine during which the haustra can be seen more easily; called also haustrations.
isometric contraction muscle contraction without appreciable shortening or change in distance between its origin and insertion.
isotonic contraction muscle contraction without appreciable change in the force of contraction; the distance between the origin and insertion becomes lessened.
lengthening contraction eccentric contraction.
postural contraction the state of muscular tension and contraction that just suffices to maintain the posture of the body.
segmental c's muscular contractions of the small intestine that serve to mix and transport chyme.
shortening contraction concentric contraction.
contraction stress test observation of the fetal heart rate in response to uterine contractions; see also fetal monitoring.
tetanic contraction (tonic contraction) physiological tetanus.
Volkmann's contraction Volkmann's contracture.

concentric contraction

muscular contraction producing movement as the result of shortening or decreasing the length of the muscle.

concentric contraction

a common form of muscle contraction that occurs in rhythmic activities when the muscle fibers shorten as tension develops. Compare eccentric contraction. See also isotonic exercise.

concentric contraction

Sports medicine Muscle contraction that occurs while the muscle is shortening as it develops tension and contracts to move a resistance. Cf Eccentric contraction.

con·cen·tric con·trac·tion

(kŏn-sen'trik kŏn-trak'shŭn)
A shortening action in which a muscle's attachments are drawn toward one another as the muscle contracts and overcomes an external resistance.
See also: eccentric contraction

concentric contraction

(concentric action) the 'true' form of contraction of a muscle in which it shortens against a load (which may be only that of gravity on the relevant body part), and so does positive work. Hence concentric exercise: that in which the principal agonists act concentrically. See also muscle contraction.

con·cen·tric con·trac·tion

(kŏn-sen'trik kŏn-trak'shŭn)
Muscular contraction producing movement as the result of shortening or decreasing the length of the muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
2000) regarding high frequency fatigue after concentric contractions.
Therefore, the first aim of this study was to evaluate fatigue time course during an isokinetic exercise composed of six sets of ten maximal concentric contractions separated by three minutes of passive recovery.
Examination of muscle activation patterns showed no significant difference between explosive isometric and fast ballistic concentric contractions.
The extent of muscle hypertrophy is dependent upon protein degradation and synthesis, which may be enhanced through high intensity, high volume eccentric and concentric contractions.
Physiological costs of eccentric contraction are different from concentric contractions, because the recruitment pattern of eccentric exercise is different from that of an equivalent concentric workload [27].
This constitutes the theory of muscle movement and the physiology of concentric contractions.