compulsory admission

(redirected from compulsory detention)

compulsory admission

A mandated admission of a patient in the UK to hospital after a formal mental health assessment under the UK’s Mental Health Act 1983, 2007, which is carried out by an Approved Mental Health Worker (formerly by an Approved Social Worker) in conjunction with a Section 12(2)-approved doctor and a consultant psychiatrist. Under the Act, the person must have a mental disorder or disability of mind (alcohol or drug addiction alone are insufficient to detain a person under the Act), require hospital detention for assessment or treatment, and the detention must be necessary in the interests of the patient's health or safety, or with a view to the protection of others.

Compulsory admissions under Mental Health Act
Section 2: Admission for assessment—for up to 28 days; not renewable.
Section 3: Admission for treatment—for up to 6 months, renewable for another 6 months.
Section 4: Admission for emergency treatment—for up to 72 hours.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mental Health Act in 1985 by the late president Shaikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan ensures treatment of mental disorders which may include compulsory detention, and with the help of the police, inside specialised facilities.
As he is a suicide risk, the Bristol businessman is now subject to a further six months' compulsory detention under the Mental Health Act, it was said.
The panel concluded: "The clinical forensic psychiatrist was not able to further consider instituting procedures leading to compulsory detention.
The next section examines sociological, ethical, and jurisprudential issues related to compulsory detention.
It does sweep up huge additional numbers of people under compulsory detention.
But the inquiry concluded the behaviour was not serious enough to merit compulsory detention under the Mental Health Act.
Campaigners addressing this disparity hope to reduce admissions to psychiatric units, to reduce incidents of compulsory detention and to help develop therapies to support people from different backgrounds.
One suggests that the negative effects of compulsory detention mean this is not a suitable solution.
People are often left to become so ill that they find themselves under a compulsory detention order when early intervention could have prevented this traumatic experience.
She would prefer her partner to be her nearest relative for the purposes of any decisions to be taken in respect of compulsory detention or other care, he added.
The creation of a system of compulsory detention for certain groups of asylum seekers is to date unfortunately a uniquely Australian achievement, a measure that makes the Department of Immigration and Multi-Cultural Affairs (DIMA) a world leader in a policy-driven process of abusing fundamental human rights.
But the panel concluded Towell's behaviour was not serious enough to merit compulsory detention under the Mental Health Act, adding that psychiatrists had concluded he was not suffering from a psychiatric disorder.