compulsory admission


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compulsory admission

A mandated admission of a patient in the UK to hospital after a formal mental health assessment under the UK’s Mental Health Act 1983, 2007, which is carried out by an Approved Mental Health Worker (formerly by an Approved Social Worker) in conjunction with a Section 12(2)-approved doctor and a consultant psychiatrist. Under the Act, the person must have a mental disorder or disability of mind (alcohol or drug addiction alone are insufficient to detain a person under the Act), require hospital detention for assessment or treatment, and the detention must be necessary in the interests of the patient's health or safety, or with a view to the protection of others.

Compulsory admissions under Mental Health Act
Section 2: Admission for assessment—for up to 28 days; not renewable.
Section 3: Admission for treatment—for up to 6 months, renewable for another 6 months.
Section 4: Admission for emergency treatment—for up to 72 hours.
References in periodicals archive ?
89) A person detained could challenge their detention by applying to the Mental Health Review Tribunal, the only legal party involved in compulsory admission cases, within six months of admission.
The major differences between the Lunacy Act and the former Bill are the amount of time a potentially mentally ill person may be involuntarily detained and the procedure for compulsory admission.
107) The Bill would have complied with the provisions of the Charter on its face by requiring treatment facilities to meet minimum standards, (108) separate units for mental health in hospitals and primary care centers, (109) and stricter procedures for compulsory admission for treatment.
The procedural elements of compulsory admission in the Bill largely complied with the recommendations in the Checklist, which would have represented a dramatic improvement from the current law.
183, [section] 8 (Nigeria 2008) (directing applications for compulsory admission to the medical director of the hospital to which admission is sought), with Lunacy Act (1958) Cap.
As legislative decisions are made to address overcrowding at state psychiatric facilities, the following issues warrant consideration: data suggests a positive correlation between rates of compulsory admission and number of psychiatric beds (13), transfers of patients to state funded treatment may be economically-motivated, especially if there is no incentive to provide treatment in another setting (15), and increasing inpatient beds without developing comprehensive outpatient treatment (which is also costly) to care for discharged patients (16,17), may only serve to increase state hospital use by those who are already high users (18) or the number of long stay patients awaiting an appropriate placement.
Quirk A, Lelliott P, Audini B, Buston K, Nonclinical and extra-legal influences on decisions about compulsory admission to psychiatric hospital.
Under Section 4 of the Act, which allows compulsory admission to hospital for a 72-hour period, he was assessed on the recommendation of a doctor, and near relative or social worker.
And in the UK between 1990-1991 and 1995-1996 there was a 45% increase in compulsory admissions to psychiatric institutions which allowed for the forcible use of electroshock -- the firing of up to 460 volts of electricity through the brain, and known to cause brain damage and memory loss.
Our information about such compulsory admissions was available only at the program level.
Readmission rates were lower when the program had a longer intended LOS, was smaller, had more compulsory admissions, or assessed family or friends as part of treatment at least 50 percent of the time.