compulsory admission


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compulsory admission

A mandated admission of a patient in the UK to hospital after a formal mental health assessment under the UK’s Mental Health Act 1983, 2007, which is carried out by an Approved Mental Health Worker (formerly by an Approved Social Worker) in conjunction with a Section 12(2)-approved doctor and a consultant psychiatrist. Under the Act, the person must have a mental disorder or disability of mind (alcohol or drug addiction alone are insufficient to detain a person under the Act), require hospital detention for assessment or treatment, and the detention must be necessary in the interests of the patient's health or safety, or with a view to the protection of others.

Compulsory admissions under Mental Health Act
Section 2: Admission for assessment—for up to 28 days; not renewable.
Section 3: Admission for treatment—for up to 6 months, renewable for another 6 months.
Section 4: Admission for emergency treatment—for up to 72 hours.
References in periodicals archive ?
0%, clinicians implicated in the aid of the mentally ill consider that the law should force the patient to compulsory admission and treatment only in case of psychiatric emergency (e.
However, one study has shown that patients who appear before tribunals find it easy to accept they require compulsory admission.
5) The Victoria database is also used to compare patients who receive CTOs early in their psychiatric illness without prior admissions and, not surprisingly, finds that they have fewer admissions compared with those who are given CTOs later in their illness at the point of discharge from compulsory admissions.
89) A person detained could challenge their detention by applying to the Mental Health Review Tribunal, the only legal party involved in compulsory admission cases, within six months of admission.
As legislative decisions are made to address overcrowding at state psychiatric facilities, the following issues warrant consideration: data suggests a positive correlation between rates of compulsory admission and number of psychiatric beds (13), transfers of patients to state funded treatment may be economically-motivated, especially if there is no incentive to provide treatment in another setting (15), and increasing inpatient beds without developing comprehensive outpatient treatment (which is also costly) to care for discharged patients (16,17), may only serve to increase state hospital use by those who are already high users (18) or the number of long stay patients awaiting an appropriate placement.
Under these circumstances, it is perhaps not surprising that South Africa has seen the re-emergence of coercive public health action (such as court orders) to enforce treatment and/or compulsory admission to hospital for XDR patients.
At 17th century St Paul's Cathedral in London there is a pounds 10 compulsory admission fee, while at Salisbury Cathedral, which dates back to 1220, it is "suggested" visitors make a voluntary donation of pounds 5.
Prosecutor Gregory Dickinson told Leicester crown court yesterday: "Consideration was given to a compulsory admission but that was not made - and it is not clear why.
Inside Outside also revealed that mentally distressed black people are more likely to be locked away, that rates of compulsory admission are markedly higher and that black and minority patients are more likely than white people to be assessed as requiring greater degrees of supervision, control and security.
Patterns of recruitment to secure facilities and factors associated with compulsory admission are then outlined.