compulsion


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compulsion

 [kom-pul´shun]
1. a recurrent, unwanted, and distressing (ego-dystonic) urge to perform an act.
2. a compulsive act or ritual; a repetitive and stereotyped action that is performed to ward off some untoward event, although the patient recognizes that it does not do so in any realistic way. It serves as a defensive substitute for unacceptable unconscious ideas or impulses. Failure to perform the compulsive act gives rise to anxiety and tension. Common compulsions involve hand-washing, touching, counting, and checking. adj., adj compul´sive. See also obsessive-compulsive.
repetition compulsion in psychoanalytic theory, the impulse to reenact earlier emotional experiences.

com·pul·sion

(kom-pŭl'shŭn),
Uncontrollable thoughts or impulses to perform an act, often repetitively, as an unconscious mechanism to avoid unacceptable ideas and desires that, by themselves, arouse anxiety; the anxiety becomes fully manifest if performance of the compulsive act is prevented; may be associated with obsessive thoughts.
[L. com-pello pp. -pulsus, to drive together, compel]

compulsion

/com·pul·sion/ (kom-pul´shun)
1. an overwhelming urge to perform an irrational act or ritual.
2. the repetitive or stereotyped action that is the object of such an urge.compul´sive

repetition compulsion  in psychoanalytic theory, the impulse to reenact earlier emotional experiences or traumatic behavior.

compulsion

(kəm-pŭl′shən)
n.
An uncontrollable impulse to perform an act, often repetitively, as an unconscious mechanism to avoid unacceptable ideas and desires which arouse anxiety.

compulsion

Etymology: L, compellere, to urge
an irresistible, repetitive irrational impulse to perform an act that is usually contrary to one's ordinary judgments or standards, yet results in overt anxiety if it is not completed. The compulsion also acts to decrease anxiety. The impulse is usually the result of an obsession. Compulsions are characteristic of an obsessive-compulsive disorder. Compare phobia. See also compulsive ritual, obsession, obsessive-compulsive disorder.

compulsion

Psychiatry A behavior or mental act which is repetitive–eg, handwashing, double-checking, or mental–eg, repeating words silently, which a person feels compelled to perform in response to an obsession, or according to rules that must be applied strictly or behaviors or mental acts aimed at preventing or ↓ distress or preventing some dreaded event or situation, which are not realistically connected with what they are intended to neutralize or prevent, or behaviors that are clearly excessive. See Repetition compulsion. Cf Obsession, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder.

com·pul·sion

(kŏm-pŭl'shŭn)
Uncontrollable impulses to perform an act, often repetitively, as an unconscious mechanism to avoid unacceptable ideas and desires which, by themselves, arouse anxiety; the anxiety becomes fully manifest if performance of the compulsive act is prevented; may be associated with obsessive thoughts.
[L. com-pello pp. -pulsus, to drive together, compel]

compulsion

1 An irresistible, or near-irresistible, impulse to perform an action, even if irrational or against the interests of the actor.
2 An act performed in response to such an impulse. See also COMPULSIVE BEHAVIOUR.

Compulsion

A repetitive or ritualistic behavior that a person performs to reduce anxiety. Compulsions often develop as a way of controlling or "undoing" obsessive thoughts.

com·pul·sion

(kŏm-pŭl'shŭn)
Uncontrollable thoughts or impulses to perform an act, often repetitively, as an unconscious mechanism to avoid unacceptable ideas and desires that, by themselves, arouse anxiety.
[L. com-pello pp. -pulsus, to drive together, compel]

compulsion (kəmpul´shən),

n a repetitive, stereotyped, and often trivial motor action, the performance of which is compelled even though the person does not wish to perform the act. Oral habits such as bruxism and clenching may become compulsions.

Patient discussion about compulsion

Q. Relation between bipolar & obsessive compulsive disorder. Is there any relation between bipolar and obsessive compulsive disorder? I ask you this because I have many answers so I have to choose one. Sorry I can’t post all which I know. Excuse me!

A. i know there is a condition called Bipolar OCD... so i don't understand the question if there's any connection... and as F3_4u mentioned - it is a common believe that OCD is a problem in serotonin secretion, the neurotransmitter that activate the "reward" feeling and stops the "seeking" system in our brain. and one of the genes that is connected to Bipolar disorder is also the serotonin gene. so there is a connection.

Q. What Is OCD? I have heard the term OCD on T.V and wanted to find out- what exactly is this syndrome?

A. OCD is a psychiatric disorder in which a person experiences obesessive thoughts and compulsions to do a ritual in order to "calm" these thoughts down. Obsessions can be recurrent and persistent thoughts, impulses, or images that are experienced at some time during the disturbance. They are inappropriate and cause marked anxiety. Compulsions are defined by repetitive behaviors or mental acts that the person feels driven to perform in response to an obsession, or according to rules that must be applied rigidly. This disorder should be diagnosed only by a doctor.

More discussions about compulsion
References in classic literature ?
And so Individualism exercises no compulsion over man.
The same principle prevails also in the choice of their senate; the manner of electing which is favourable also to an oligarchy; for all are obliged to vote for those who are senators of the first class, afterwards they vote for the same number out of the second, and then out of the third; but this compulsion to vote at the election of senators does not extend to the third and fourth classes and the first and second class only are obliged to vote for the fourth.
Reverence for the hallowed Past and its traditions keeps the dismal fashion in force now that the compulsion exists no longer.
The Russians, on the contrary, ought according to tactics to have attacked in mass, but in fact they split up into small units, because their spirit had so risen that separate individuals, without orders, dealt blows at the French without needing any compulsion to induce them to expose themselves to hardships and dangers.
But for the urgency of conscience and the knowledge that I am before the bar of One who seeth not as man seeth, I should be under no compulsion to make the disclosure which has been my object in asking you to come here to-night.
He drank wine only on very rare occasions, and then under compulsion.
There are different methods of compulsion," Aynesworth answered.
Never divining Joan's fluttering wildness, her blind hatred of restraint and compulsion, her abhorrence of mastery by another, and mistaking the warmth and enthusiasm in her eyes (aroused by his latest tale) for something tender and acquiescent, he drew her to him, laid a forcible detaining arm about her waist, and misapprehended her frantic revolt for an exhibition of maidenly reluctance.
It was impossible for any woman to live with him, and yet they did live with him, out of compulsion.
To pack for days over the gale-swept passes or across the mosquito-ridden marshes, and to pack double the weight his comrade packed, did not involve unfairness or compulsion.
Just as he must immediately howl, he was aware that the idea, an entirely different idea, was there, in the innermost centre of the quick-thinkingness of him, with all its compulsion.
There was in his nature a logical compulsion toward completeness.