compromise

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compromise

 [kom´pro-mīz]
1. to make a decision by mutual consent in which neither party has all demands met but both agree that it is acceptable.
2. to take an action or place a patient in a position that endangers health and well-being.

compromise

(kŏm′prə-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
b. The result of such a settlement.
2. Something that combines qualities or elements of different things: The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.
3. A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards: a compromise of morality.
4. Impairment, as by disease or injury: physiological compromise.
v. compro·mised, compro·mising, compro·mises
v.intr.
1. To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
2. To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
v.tr.
1.
a. To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute: a secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.
b. To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower: Don't compromise your standards.
2. To impair, as by disease or injury: an immune system that was compromised by a virus.
3. To settle by mutual concessions: a dispute that was compromised.

com′pro·mis′er n.

compromise

[kom′prəmīs]
Etymology: L, com, together, promittere, to promise
1 an action that may involve a change in a person's behavior, as in substituting goals or delaying satisfaction of needs in one area to reduce stress in another.
2 an illness or condition that can affect another part of the body.

compromise (käm´prəmīz´),

n an arrangement arrived at, in or out of court, for settling a disagreement on terms considered by the parties to be fair.
References in periodicals archive ?
These are predicaments where any accord or decision is faulty, so that compromising is unavoidable.
Here the justification problem can be posed in this way: taking for granted that compromising is morally right in this particular situation, what is the content of the compromise?
Indeed, there is an "intimate relation" between compromising and second best decisions, as Margalit (2010, p.
The significance of my point is that those motives are not merely the causes of the CS, but of compromising in general.
Nevertheless the agent may still think that it is not worth compromising.
As the former terrorists instance shows, if no basic judgment is involved, then a non-integrity compromising decision is possible.
Consequently, there will be a loss of value if the right is eventually not respected in order to strike a compromise, and in this case the CD would be integrity compromising but justified within the agent's general outlook.
In any case, a CD is not integrity compromising if no basic judgment is entailed; nevertheless, an integrity compromising CD could also be justified within the agent's moral outlook.
For example, major banking institutions need to protect their customer data, applications and history without compromising their customer's account or their online access.
As a result, enterprises, e-businesses and service providers can reduce operational expenditures while protecting and securely delivering business-critical web applications without compromising performance.