compromise

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compromise

 [kom´pro-mīz]
1. to make a decision by mutual consent in which neither party has all demands met but both agree that it is acceptable.
2. to take an action or place a patient in a position that endangers health and well-being.

compromise

(kŏm′prə-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
b. The result of such a settlement.
2. Something that combines qualities or elements of different things: The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.
3. A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards: a compromise of morality.
4. Impairment, as by disease or injury: physiological compromise.
v. compro·mised, compro·mising, compro·mises
v.intr.
1. To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
2. To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
v.tr.
1.
a. To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute: a secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.
b. To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower: Don't compromise your standards.
2. To impair, as by disease or injury: an immune system that was compromised by a virus.
3. To settle by mutual concessions: a dispute that was compromised.

com′pro·mis′er n.

compromise

[kom′prəmīs]
Etymology: L, com, together, promittere, to promise
1 an action that may involve a change in a person's behavior, as in substituting goals or delaying satisfaction of needs in one area to reduce stress in another.
2 an illness or condition that can affect another part of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, in the end, those kinds of compromises can reap benefits, too, in terms of tolerance, respect and even understanding.
In this second meaning, compromises are states or outcomes that are accepted as solutions although they make room for damaging or even derogatory consequences.
Readers will find excellent advice in the book as they scrutinize the morality of the compromises their leaders make on their behalf.
For credit unions, the breach reinforced the critical nature of a compromise mitigation plan.
a provider of compromise detection solutions (CDS) that mitigate malicious intruders and unauthorized access on internal networks, has introduced the industry's first Compromise Assessment(TM) program.
In November 2001, they submitted Form 656, Offer in Compromise, with $4,457, the cash surrender value of Ronald's life insurance policy.
The survey found a smaller number of people who believe that deeply religious elected officials sometimes have to compromise in the political arena, with major decreases among those who attend religious services weekly.
Public Agenda found that support for political compromise had dropped among all Americans as well.
By this time, the necessity of compromise between aspirations and realities, which seems to be Eliot's main argument, should have become explicit; if not, the teacher should point it out be examples from the narrative.
Thomas and Kilmann identify five fundamental modes or approaches to conflict management: competition, avoidance, compromise, accommodation, and collaboration.
Had the various compromises required to build the coalition undercut the law's social benefit?