compromise

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compromise

 [kom´pro-mīz]
1. to make a decision by mutual consent in which neither party has all demands met but both agree that it is acceptable.
2. to take an action or place a patient in a position that endangers health and well-being.

compromise

(kŏm′prə-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
b. The result of such a settlement.
2. Something that combines qualities or elements of different things: The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.
3. A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards: a compromise of morality.
4. Impairment, as by disease or injury: physiological compromise.
v. compro·mised, compro·mising, compro·mises
v.intr.
1. To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
2. To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
v.tr.
1.
a. To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute: a secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.
b. To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower: Don't compromise your standards.
2. To impair, as by disease or injury: an immune system that was compromised by a virus.
3. To settle by mutual concessions: a dispute that was compromised.

com′pro·mis′er n.

compromise

[kom′prəmīs]
Etymology: L, com, together, promittere, to promise
1 an action that may involve a change in a person's behavior, as in substituting goals or delaying satisfaction of needs in one area to reduce stress in another.
2 an illness or condition that can affect another part of the body.

compromise (käm´prəmīz´),

n an arrangement arrived at, in or out of court, for settling a disagreement on terms considered by the parties to be fair.
References in periodicals archive ?
In daily life we may use all of the interaction styles (avoider, accommodater, competer, compromiser, and collaborator), depending on the situation.
An accommodator will have a high focus on the relationship and a low focus on the issue; a compromiser, a midlevel focus on the relationship and a mid-level focus on the issue; and a collaborator, a high focus on both the issue and relationship.
Jewish fundamentalists found this "other" in all Jews who were not formally Zionist and were seen as political and moral compromisers.
One thing is sure," argues Matey's husband after the war, "we are all responsible, even compromisers like me who wouldn't fire a gun but went around helping patch up the wounded so that they could go back and kill some more" (360).
Cooperative activities require individual responsibility and group effort to succeed, and allow children to take on the roles of leaders, followers, and compromisers.
Ahmadinejad said the compromisers are making efforts to underestimate all positive works and progress of Iranian nation with their hostility.
Shoppers who buy character-licensed products in supermarkets tend to fall into three categories; nurturers, entertainers and compromisers, according to our cross-category research.
No room exists for the doubtful, the half-convinced, the timid, for compromisers or those who are merely allies, not members.
Having previously been firm that a rise in the minimum must be accompanied by a similar hike in the maximum, I am prepared to bend to the compromisers - mainly trainers - who say one should not follow the other.
Northern philanthropy and the emergence of black education: Do-gooders, compromisers, or co-conspirators?
He is a welcome antidote to the grey compromisers in so many managerial seats.
Having disposed of the more ferocious and the more dangerous of the two infidel superpowers, their next task was to deal with the other, the United States, and in this war the compromisers were tools and agents of the infidel enemy.