compromise

(redirected from compromiser)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

compromise

 [kom´pro-mīz]
1. to make a decision by mutual consent in which neither party has all demands met but both agree that it is acceptable.
2. to take an action or place a patient in a position that endangers health and well-being.

compromise

(kŏm′prə-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
b. The result of such a settlement.
2. Something that combines qualities or elements of different things: The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.
3. A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards: a compromise of morality.
4. Impairment, as by disease or injury: physiological compromise.
v. compro·mised, compro·mising, compro·mises
v.intr.
1. To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
2. To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
v.tr.
1.
a. To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute: a secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.
b. To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower: Don't compromise your standards.
2. To impair, as by disease or injury: an immune system that was compromised by a virus.
3. To settle by mutual concessions: a dispute that was compromised.

com′pro·mis′er n.

compromise

[kom′prəmīs]
Etymology: L, com, together, promittere, to promise
1 an action that may involve a change in a person's behavior, as in substituting goals or delaying satisfaction of needs in one area to reduce stress in another.
2 an illness or condition that can affect another part of the body.

compromise (käm´prəmīz´),

n an arrangement arrived at, in or out of court, for settling a disagreement on terms considered by the parties to be fair.
References in periodicals archive ?
Identify your preferred style of dealing with conflict--determine whether you a competitor, collaborator, compromiser, avoider, or accommodator, and then challenge yourself to adapt your style to the situation.
Paredes, who represented the PRI in the 2006 Mexico City mayoral election (see SourceMex, 2006-07-12), campaigned as a compromiser who could bring the party together while Jackson cast himself as a candidate who could bring new energy to the party.
Beebe had a reputation in the Senate as a compromiser.
A friend and follower of Blanqui, Vaillant often played the role of communard compromiser, attempting to mediate disputes between the extremist neo-Jacobins and the more moderate socialists.
One of Armey's Axioms is that political ambition is a great compromiser.
Always a compromiser, Kadar was an abandoned and ill-educated offspring of a deeply disadvantaged single-parent family from an outlying province.
Fairly or not, Mohammad Khatami has been called a compromiser, an appeaser, a collaborator and an apologist for the regime.
In any event, Xie was a very smooth, evasive, and careful bureaucrat, a perpetual compromiser rather than a confrontationist.
Throughout his seven years in the Senate, he has prided himself on keeping his cool and being a compromiser.
Kemmis writes as a genuine compromiser and reformer; Behan makes radical arguments for a clean sweep.
It's an open question whether La Follette would have achieved more by being a compromiser, by softening his attacks on corporate power, or by muffling his voice during World War I.
To be sure, it is usually necessary to be an incrementalist and a compromiser in the policy world, but this very practical stance should be in the context of a larger vision.