compromise

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compromise

 [kom´pro-mīz]
1. to make a decision by mutual consent in which neither party has all demands met but both agree that it is acceptable.
2. to take an action or place a patient in a position that endangers health and well-being.

compromise

(kŏm′prə-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. A settlement of differences in which each side makes concessions.
b. The result of such a settlement.
2. Something that combines qualities or elements of different things: The incongruous design is a compromise between high tech and early American.
3. A weakening or reduction of one's principles or standards: a compromise of morality.
4. Impairment, as by disease or injury: physiological compromise.
v. compro·mised, compro·mising, compro·mises
v.intr.
1. To arrive at a settlement by making concessions.
2. To reduce the quality, value, or degree of something, such as one's ideals.
v.tr.
1.
a. To expose or make liable to danger, suspicion, or disrepute: a secret mission that was compromised and had to be abandoned.
b. To reduce in quality, value, or degree; weaken or lower: Don't compromise your standards.
2. To impair, as by disease or injury: an immune system that was compromised by a virus.
3. To settle by mutual concessions: a dispute that was compromised.

com′pro·mis′er n.

compromise

[kom′prəmīs]
Etymology: L, com, together, promittere, to promise
1 an action that may involve a change in a person's behavior, as in substituting goals or delaying satisfaction of needs in one area to reduce stress in another.
2 an illness or condition that can affect another part of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The compromiser has not fulfilled her part of the deal, and she is thus morally blameworthy (if the pact is a fair one), or at least she loses credibility.
Finally, there is a third group who are the collaborators and compromisers.
Clinton is a compromiser, not a leader," says media lawyer Sanford.
I knew the document would stir up a lot of trouble, I just hadn't expected so much of it to come my way," says Abu Sharif, who was abused by fellow PLO members as "a turn-coat, a Quisling, a compromiser and an Israeli stooge.
Specialty coffee was not then, and is not now a game for the weak of spirit, for the compromiser, and the apologist.
The most important Kentuckian since Henry Clay, McConnell knows how his hero Clay, who was called ''the great compromiser,'' failed to engineer Senate passage of a comprehensive compromise in 1850.
Lebanese Forces parliamentarians including George Adwan, a gifted speaker who frequently delves into unclear monologues, and Sitrida Geagea, a charismatic politician who outshines her husband Samir and who is an able compromiser, may not vote for the proposal either.
Meanwhile, Day-Lewis plays Lincoln as a physically awkward but not unhandsome figure, gentle with his children, uncomfortable with ceremony (his disdain of calfskin gloves becomes a running joke), and firm when needed with colleagues who could not always see the wisdom in the man some considered "the capitulating compromiser.
Because Clay believed so strongly in national unity and fought for it throughout his almost 50-year political career, he became known as "the Great Compromiser.
For FA chairman David Bernstein, a born compromiser who believes that conflict is always the last resort, today's meeting at Wembley will be all about trying to find a way forward.
Clay had preserved the Union and cemented his role as "The Great Compromiser.
Romney would cast himself as a compromiser, while Bachmann -- as seen in her (http://www.