therapy

(redirected from compromise periodontal maintenance therapy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

therapy

 [ther´ah-pe]
activity therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the prescription of and assistance with specific physical, cognitive, social, and spiritual activities to increase the range, frequency, or duration of an individual's (or group's) activity.
aerosol therapy see aerosol therapy.
animal-assisted therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful use of animals to provide affection, attention, diversion, and relaxation.
anticoagulant therapy see anticoagulant therapy.
antineoplastic therapy see antineoplastic therapy.
antiplatelet therapy the use of platelet inhibitors such as aspirin, dipyridamole, or sulfinpyrazone, to inhibit platelet adhesion or aggregation and so prevent thrombosis, alter the course of atherosclerosis, or prolong vascular graft patency.
art therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitation of communication through drawings or other art forms.
aversion therapy (aversive therapy) a form of behavior therapy that uses aversive conditioning, pairing undesirable behavior or symptoms with unpleasant stimulation in order to reduce or eliminate the behavior of symptoms. The term is sometimes used synonymously with aversive conditioning.
behavior therapy see behavior therapy.
carbon dioxide–oxygen therapy see carbon dioxide–oxygen therapy.
chest physical therapy see under physical therapy.
client-centered therapy a form of psychotherapy in which the emphasis is on the patient's self-discovery, interpretation, conflict resolution, and reorganization of values and life approach, which are enabled by the warm, nondirective, unconditionally accepting support of the therapist, who reflects and clarifies the patient's discoveries.
cognitive therapy (cognitive-behavioral therapy) a directive form of psychotherapy based on the theory that emotional problems result from distorted attitudes and ways of thinking that can be corrected. Using techniques drawn in part from behavior therapy, the therapist actively seeks to guide the patient in altering or revising negative or erroneous perceptions and attitudes.
collapse therapy a formerly common treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis in which the diseased lung was collapsed in order to immobilize it and allow it to rest. pneumonolysis and thoracoplasty are methods still sometimes used to collapse a lung and allow access during thoracic surgery.
combined modality therapy treatment of cancer using two or more types of therapy, such as with chemoradiotherapy. Called also multimodality therapy.
compression therapy treatment of venous insufficiency, varicose veins, or venous ulceration of the lower limbs by having the patient wear compressing garments such as support hose.
continuous renal replacement therapy hemodialysis or hemofiltration done 24 hours a day for an extended period, usually in a critically ill patient.
convulsive therapy treatment of mental disorders, primarily depression, by induction of convulsions. The type almost universally used now is electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), in which the convulsions are induced by electric current. In the past, drugs were sometimes used.
couples therapy marital t.
diet therapy treatment of disease by regulation of the diet.
electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) (electroshock therapy) see electroconvulsive therapy.
endocrine therapy treatment of disease by means of hormones; called also hormonal or hormone therapy.
estrogen replacement therapy administration of an estrogen to treat estrogen deficiency, such as that occurring after menopause; there are a number of indications, including the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and coronary artery disease, and the prevention and treatment of vasomotor symptoms such as hot flashes and of thinning of the skin and vaginal epithelium, atrophic vaginitis, and vulvar atrophy. In women with a uterus, a progestational agent is usually included to prevent endometrial hyperplasia. Called also hormone replacement therapy.
exercise therapy: ambulation in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as promotion of and assistance with walking to maintain or restore autonomic and voluntary body functions during treatment and recovery from illness or injury.
exercise therapy: balance in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as use of specific activities, postures, and movements to maintain, enhance, or restore balance.
exercise therapy: joint mobility in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of active or passive body movement to maintain or restore joint flexibility.
exercise therapy: muscle control in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of specific activity or exercise protocols to enhance or restore controlled body movement.
family therapy
1. group therapy of the members of a family, exploring and improving family relationships and processes, understanding and modifying home influences that contribute to mental disorder in one or more family members, and improving communication and collective, constructive methods of problem-solving.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as assisting family members to move their family toward a more productive way of living.
gold therapy chrysotherapy.
group therapy see group therapy.
helium-oxygen therapy see helium-oxygen therapy.
hemodialysis therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as management of extracorporeal passage of the patient's blood through a hemodialyzer. See also hemodialysis.
hemofiltration therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as cleansing of acutely ill patient's blood via a hemofilter controlled by the patient's hydrostatic pressure. See also hemofiltration.
highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) the aggressive use of extremely potent antiretroviral agents in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection.
hormonal therapy (hormone therapy) endocrine therapy.
hormone replacement therapy the administration of hormones to correct a deficiency; usually used to denote estrogen replacement therapy occurring after menopause.
host modulating therapy efforts to control periodontal disease by directly targeting the host response; an example is the use of drugs that do this, such as sub-antimicrobial doses of doxycycline, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, or bisphosphonates.
humidification therapy (humidity therapy) the therapeutic use of air supersaturated with water to prevent or correct a moisture deficit in the respiratory tract; see also humidity therapy.
immunosuppressive therapy therapeutic immunosuppression.
inhalation therapy the term formerly used for respiratory care (def. 3).
intravenous therapy (IV therapy) in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administration and monitoring of intravenous infusions of fluids and medications.
leech therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application of medicinal leeches to help drain replanted or transplanted tissue engorged with venous blood.
marital therapy a type of family therapy aimed at understanding and treating one or both members of a couple in the context of a distressed relationship, but not necessarily addressing the discordant relationship itself. In the past, the term has also been used in a narrower sense to mean what is defined as marriage therapy, but that is increasingly considered a subset of marital therapy. Called also couples therapy.
marriage therapy a subset of marital therapy that focuses specifically on the bond of marriage between two people, enhancing and preserving it.
milieu therapy
1. treatment, usually in a psychiatric treatment center, that emphasizes the provision of an environment and activities appropriate to the patient's emotional and interpersonal needs.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of people, resources, and events in the patient's immediate environment to promote optimal psychosocial functioning.
multimodality therapy combined modality therapy.
music therapy
1. the use of music to effect positive changes in the psychological, physical, cognitive, or social functioning of individuals with health or educational problems. Music therapy is used for a wide variety of conditions, including mental disorders, developmental and learning disabilities, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions related to aging, brain injury, substance abuse, and physical disability. It is also used for the management of acute and chronic pain and for the reduction of stress.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as using music to help achieve a specific change in behavior or feeling.
neoadjuvant therapy in single-agent therapy or combined modality therapy for cancer, initial use of one modality, such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy, to decrease tumor burden prior to use of another modality, usually surgery.
nutrition therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administration of food and fluids to support metabolic processes of a patient who is malnourished or at high risk for becoming malnourished. See also nutrition.
occupational therapy see occupational therapy.
optometric vision therapy a treatment plan prescribed to correct or improve specific dysfunctions of the vision system; it includes, but is not limited to, the treatment of strabismus (turned eye), other dysfunctions of binocularity (eye teaming), amblyopia (lazy eye), accommodation (eye focusing), ocular motor function (general eye movement ability), and visual-motor and visual-perceptual abilities.
oral rehydration therapy (ORT) oral administration of a solution of electrolytes and carbohydrates in the treatment of dehydration.
oxygen therapy see oxygen therapy.
peritoneal dialysis therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as administration and monitoring of dialysis solution into and out of the peritoneal cavity. See also peritoneal dialysis.
physical therapy see physical therapy.
play therapy see play therapy.
pulp canal therapy root canal therapy.
PUVA therapy [psoralen + ultraviolet A], a form of photochemotherapy for skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo; oral psoralen administration is followed two hours later by exposure to ultraviolet a radiation.
radiation therapy see radiation therapy.
recreation therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful use of recreation to promote relaxation and enhancement of social skills.
reminiscence therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as using the recall of past events, feelings, and thoughts to facilitate pleasure, quality of life, or adaptation to present circumstances.
renal replacement therapy therapy such as hemodialysis or transplantation that takes the place of nonfunctioning kidneys. See also continuous renal replacement therapy.
replacement therapy treatment to replace deficient formation or loss of body products by administration of the natural body products or synthetic substitutes. See also replacement. Called also substitution therapy.
respiratory therapy respiratory care.
root canal therapy that aspect of endodontics dealing with the treatment of diseases of the dental pulp, consisting of partial (pulpotomy) or complete (pulpectomy) extirpation of the diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty root canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive sealing material, and obturation of the canal with a nonirritating hermetic sealing agent. Called also pulp canal therapy.
shock therapy obsolete term for convulsive therapy.
simple relaxation therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the use of techniques to encourage and elicit relaxation for the purpose of decreasing undesirable signs and symptoms such as pain, muscle tension, or anxiety.
speech therapy the use of special techniques for correction of speech disorders.
substitution therapy replacement therapy.
swallowing therapy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating swallowing and preventing complications of impaired swallowing.
thrombolytic therapy the administration of drugs for thrombolysis (dissolution of a thrombus in an artery), to reduce the size of occlusion and thereby reduce damage to muscular tissue; the coronary artery is a commonly used site. Agents commonly used are streptokinase and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA).
thyroid replacement therapy treatment of hypothyroidism by administration of thyroxine, usually in the form of levothyroxine sodium. Called also thyrotherapy.
ultraviolet therapy see ultraviolet therapy.

ther·a·py

(thār'ă-pē),
1. The treatment of disease or disorder by any method.
See also: therapeutics.
See also: psychotherapy, psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis.
2. In psychiatry and clinical psychology, a short term for psychotherapy.
See also: psychotherapy, psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis.
Synonym(s): therapeusis (2) , therapia (1)
[G. therapeia, medical treatment]

therapy

/ther·a·py/ (-pe) the treatment of disease; see also treatment.
ablation therapy  the destruction of small areas of myocardial tissue, usually by application of electrical or chemical energy, in the treatment of some tachyarrhythmias.
adjuvant therapy  the use of chemotherapy or radiotherapy in addition to surgical resection in the treatment of cancer.
antiplatelet therapy  the use of platelet-modifying agents to inhibit platelet adhesion or aggregation and so prevent thrombosis, alter the course of atherosclerosis, or prolong vascular graft patency.
art therapy  the use of art, the creative process, and patient response to the products created for the treatment of psychiatric and psychologic conditions and for rehabilitation.
aversion therapy , aversive therapy that using aversive conditioning to reduce or eliminate undesirable behavior or symptoms; sometimes used synonymously with aversive conditioning.
behavior therapy  a therapeutic approach that focuses on modifying the patient's observable behavior, rather than on the conflicts and unconscious processes presumed to underlie the behavior.
biological therapy  treatment of disease by injection of substances that produce a biological reaction in the organism.
chelation therapy  the use of a chelating agent to remove toxic metals from the body, used in the treatment of heavy metal poisoning. In complementary medicine, also used for the treatment of atherosclerosis and other disorders.
cognitive therapy , cognitive-behavioral therapy that based on the theory that emotional problems result from distorted attitudes and ways of thinking that can be corrected, the therapist guiding the patient to do so.
convulsive therapy  treatment of mental disorders, primarily depression, by induction of convulsions; now it is virtually always by electric shock (electroconvulsive t.) .
couples therapy  marital t.
dance therapy  the therapeutic use of movement to further the emotional, social, cognitive, and physical integration of the individual in the treatment of a variety of social, emotional, cognitive, and physical disorders.
electroconvulsive therapy  (ECT) a treatment for mental disorders, primarily depression, in which convulsions and loss of consciousness are induced by application of brief pulses of low-voltage alternating current to the brain via scalp electrodes.
electroshock therapy  (EST) electroconvulsive t.
endocrine therapy  treatment of disease by the use of hormones.
estrogen replacement therapy  administration of an estrogen to treat estrogen deficiency, as that following menopause; in women with a uterus, a progestational agent is usually included to prevent endometrial hyperplasia.
enzyme therapy  in complementary medicine, the oral administration of proteolytic enzymes to improve immune system function; used for a wide variety of disorders and as adjunctive therapy in cancer treatment.
family therapy  group therapy of the members of a family, exploring and improving family relationships and processes and thus the mental health of the collective unit and of individual members.
fibrinolytic therapy  the use of fibrinolytic agents (e.g., prourokinase) to lyse thrombi in patients with acute peripheral arterial occlusion, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, or acute myocardial infarction.
gene therapy  manipulation of the genome of an individual to prevent, mask, or lessen the effects of a genetic disorder.
group therapy  psychotherapy carried out regularly with a group of patients under the guidance of a group leader, usually a therapist.
highly active antiretroviral therapy  (HAART) the aggressive use of extremely potent antiretroviral agents in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection.
hormonal therapy , hormone therapy endocrine t.
hormone replacement therapy  the administration of hormones to correct a deficiency, such as postmenopausal estrogen replacement ttherapy.
immunosuppressive therapy  treatment with agents, such as x-rays, corticosteroids, or cytotoxic chemicals, that suppress the immune response to antigen(s); used in conditions such as organ transplantation, autoimmune disease, allergy, multiple myeloma, and chronic nephritis.
inhalation therapy  former name for respiratory care (2).
light therapy 
1. phototherapy (def. 1).
marital therapy  a type of family therapy aimed at understanding and treating one or both members of a couple in the context of a distressed relationship, but not necessarily addressing the discordant relationship itself; sometimes used more restrictively as a synonym of marriage therapy .
marriage therapy  a subset of marital therapy (q.v.) that focuses specifically on the bond of marriage between two people, enhancing and preserving it.
massage therapy  the manipulation of the soft tissues of the body for the purpose of normalizing them, thereby enhancing health and healing.
milieu therapy  treatment, usually in a psychiatric hospital, that emphasizes the provision of an environment and activities appropriate to the patient's emotional and interpersonal needs.
music therapy  the use of music to effect positive changes in the psychological, physical, cognitive, or social functioning of individuals with health or educational problems.
occupational therapy  the therapeutic use of self-care, work, and play activities to increase function, enhance development, and prevent disabilities.
oral rehydration therapy  (ORT) oral administration of a solution of electrolytes and carbohydrates in the treatment of dehydration.
orthomolecular therapy  treatment of disease based on the theory that restoration of optimal concentrations of substances normally present in the body, such as vitamins, trace elements, and amino acids, will effect a cure.
photodynamic therapy  intravenous administration of hematoporphyrin derivative, which concentrates selectively in metabolically active tumor tissue, followed by exposure of the tumor tissue to red laser light to produce cytotoxic free radicals that destroy hematoporphyrin-containing tissue.
physical therapy 
1. treatment by physical means.
2. the health profession concerned with the promotion of health, the prevention of disability, and the evaluation and rehabilitation of patients disabled by pain, disease, or injury, and with treatment by physical therapeutic measures as opposed to medical, surgical, or radiologic measures.
poetry therapy  a form of bibliotherapy in which a selected poem, which may be created by the patient, is used to evoke feelings and responses for discussion in a therapeutic setting.
PUVA therapy  a form of photochemotherapy for skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo; oral psoralen administration is followed two hours later by exposure to ultraviolet light.
radiation therapy  radiotherapy.
relaxation therapy  any of a number of techniques for inducing the relaxation response, used for the reduction of stress; useful in the management of a wide variety of chronic illnesses caused or exacerbated by stress.
replacement therapy 
1. treatment to replace deficiencies in body products by administration of natural or synthetic substitutes.
2. treatment that replaces or compensates for a nonfunctioning organ, e.g., hemodialysis.
respiratory therapy  see under care.
substitution therapy  the administration of a hormone to compensate for glandular deficiency.
thrombolytic therapy  fibrinolytic t.
thyroid replacement therapy  treatment with a preparation of a thyroid hormone.

therapy

(thĕr′ə-pē)
n. pl. thera·pies
1. Treatment of illness, injury, or disability.
2. Psychotherapy.
3. Healing power or quality: the therapy of fresh air and sun.

therapy

[ther′əpē]
Etymology: Gk, therapeia, treatment
the treatment of any disease or a pathological condition, such as inhalation therapy, which administers various medicines for patients suffering from diseases of the respiratory tract.

therapy

A general term for any form of management of a particular condition; treatment intended and expected to alleviate a disease or disorder; any technique of recovery, which may be medical, psychiatric, or psychological. See Ablation therapy, 'Abracadabra therapy, ' Adjunctive therapy, Adjuvant therapy, Air ionization therapy, Alternative therapy, Amino acid therapy, Androgen deprivation therapy, Androgen replacement therapy, Angiogenic gene therapy, Antiadhesive therapy, Antiarrhythmic therapy, Antibiotherapy, Antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy, Anticoagulant therapy, Antioxidant therapy, Antiplatelet therapy, Antisense therapy, Antistenotic therapy, Autohemotherapy, Autolymphocyte therapy, Autosuggestion therapy, Aversion therapy, B chain therapy, B-1 therapy, Baggie therapy, Balance therapy, BCS therapy, Bee venom therapy, Behavior therapy, Benjamin system of muscular therapy, Biodynamic therapy, Biotherapy, Bladder-conserving therapy, Blood component therapy, Body therapy, Body-oriented psychotherapy, Boron therapy, Brachytherapy, Breast conservation therapy, Breath therapy, Bright light therapy, Burst therapy, Cardiovascular gene therapy, Castration therapy, Catheter ablation therapy, Cell therapy, Chelation therapy, Chemotherapy, Chiropractic therapy, Chronotherapy, Cognitive therapy, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Cold therapy, Colon therapy, Combination therapy, Combination chemotherapy, Combined modality therapy, Concentration therapy, Concept therapy, Condom therapy, Confrontation therapy, Conservative therapy, Continuous sleep therapy, Conventional therapy, Convergent therapy, Creative arts therapy, Cryotherapy, Cymatic therapy, Cytokine gene therapy, Dance (movement) therapy, Desensitization therapy, Detoxification therapy, Differentiation therapy, Directly-observed therapy, Double whammy therapy, Drama therapy, Dream therapy, E5 therapy, Electric therapy, Electroconvulsive therapy, Encapsulated cell therapy, Electroporation therapy, Encounter group therapy, Enzyme therapy, Enzyme replacement therapy, Estrogen replacement therapy, Exercise/movement therapy, Ex vivo therapy, Ex vivo gene therapy, Extracorporeal shock wave therapy, Fab therapy, Family therapy, Fever therapy, Fourth therapy, Germ cell gene therapy, Gene therapy, Gestalt therapy, Group therapy, HAART therapy, Heat therapy, Hematogenic oxidation therapy, Heroic therapy, High-dose chemotherapy, High pH therapy, Hippotherapy, Home infusion therapy, Hormonal therapy, Hormone-replacement therapy, Hydrogen peroxide therapy, Hypnotherapy, Hypnotic psychotherapy, Image aversion therapy, Immunoaugmentive therapy, Immunosuppressive therapy, Immunotherapy, IMRT, Induction therapy, Information therapy, Injection sclerotherapy, Integrative therapy, Interstim® continence-control therapy, Interstitial therapy, Interventional therapy, Intracavitary therapy, Intraoperative radiation therapy, Intrathecal baclofen therapy, Intravesicular therapy, Iron-chelation therapy, Laser therapy, Laughter therapy, Leukemia therapy, Life-extending therapy, Light therapy, Lipid therapy, Local therapy, Low-flow oxygen therapy, Magnet therapy, Magnetotherapy, Maintenance drug therapy, Maintenance therapy, Malariotherapy, Management, Massage therapy, Maternal blood clot patch therapy, Mechanotherapy, Medical fetal therapy, Megavitamin therapy, Mobilization therapy, Monopolar/electrohydrothermal coagulation therapy, Monotherapy, Movement therapy, Multimodal therapy, Myeloablative therapy, Myelosuppressive therapy, Myofascial release therapy, Neoadjuvant therapy, Nicotine replacement therapy, Nutritional therapy, Ocular photodynamic therapy, Open therapy, Oral chelation therapy, Oral rehydration therapy, Oxidative therapy, Ozone therapy, Palliative therapy, Patch therapy, Pet therapy, Photochemotherapy, Photodynamic therapy, Phototherapy, Physical therapy, Physiotherapy, Play therapy, Polarity therapy, Postural therapy, Preventive therapy, Pranic therapy, Psychotherapy, Preemptive therapy, Preemptive chemotherapy, Pressure point therapy, Prophylactic antibiotic therapy, Psychotherapy, PUVA therapy, Quality of life therapy, Radiation therapy, Radioimmunotherapy, Radiotherapy, Reconstructive therapy, Recreational therapy, Remission induction therapy, Reperfusion therapy, Respiratory therapy, REST, RIGS®/ACT therapy, Rogerian therapy, St John's neuromuscular therapy, Sclerotherapy, Sensory therapy, Shot therapy, Single-drug therapy, Steam inhalation therapy, Stem-cell therapy, Step-down therapy, Strain-counterstrain therapy, Stress therapy, Subliminal therapy, Suicide gene therapy, Surfactant replacement therapy, Superovulation therapy, Supplemental therapy, Supportive therapy, Synvisc® injection therapy, Systemic therapy, Third-line therapy, Thrombolytic therapy, TIL therapy, Topical chemotherapy, Topical immunotherapy, Treatment, Tremor control therapy, Trigger point injection therapy, Triple therapy, Ultrasound therapy, Vaccine therapy, Virtual reality exposure therapy, Vision therapy, Water-based therapy, Water-induced thermotherapy, Water therapy, Zone therapy.

ther·a·py

(thār'ă-pē)
1. Systematic treatment of a disease, dysfunction, or disorder.
See also: therapeutics
2. psychiatry, clinical psychology Psychotherapy.
See also: psychotherapy, psychiatry, psychology, psychoanalysis
[G. therapeia, medical treatment]

therapy

Treatment of disease or of conditions supposed to be diseases. The term is often qualified to limit its range, as in CHEMOTHERAPY, PHYSIOTHERAPY, PSYCHOTHERAPY, RADIOTHERAPY, HYDROTHERAPY and HYPNOTHERAPY.

therapy,

n method used to cure an illness.
therapy localization,
n revealing of emotional aspects of a physical dysfunction by simultaneously testing an indicator muscle with its asso-ciated emotional neuromuscular reflex(es).
therapies, being,
n.pl in holistic nursing, therapeutic approaches that involve one's sense of peace and awareness. The patient may use prayer, meditation, quiet contemplation, and imagery.
therapies, doing,
n.pl in holistic nursing, directed therapeutic ap-proach that involves several con-ventional medicine techniques, such as traditional procedures, medications, and surgery with a specific goal or outcome.
therapies, elimination,
n.pl in Ayurveda, the processes that patients undergo at the end of the day's treatment that serve to eliminate impurities, which have been loosened during the therapies. See also anu and naruha.
therapies, expressive,
n.pl ap-proaches where expressive arts are employed to promote awareness, healing, and growth.
therapies, five-sense,
n.pl in Ayurveda, the fundamental treatments for restoring imbalances of the doshas. The therapies include diet and herbs (taste), color therapies (sight), mantras (hearing), aromatherapy (smell), and massage (touch), all of which are prescribed to balance dosha(s). Meditation is the therapy for what is considered the sixth sense, the mind. See also doshas, mantras.
therapies, mind-body,
n.pl therapies such as hypnosis, visual imagery, yoga, relaxation, and meditation, in which the mind and body are used in conjunction to assist or catalyze the healing process.
therapies, mind-body-spirit,
n.pl therapeutic modalities that involve body postures, breathing, movement, prayer, and/or meditation to facilitate relaxation and awareness of mental, emotional, and spiritual states.
therapies, Native American,
n.pl various traditional and modern herbal treatments and ceremonies used to address physical complaints and psychospiritual maladies.
therapies, nature-based,
n.pl techniques that use nature-based animals or plants that reconnect patients to the natural environment and its rhythms to improve and hasten healing and improve quality of life.
therapy, adjuvant (aˑ·j·vnt theˑ·r·pē),
n the use of one therapy to boost or enhance the effect of another, See also compatible.
therapy, alleviation (·lēˈ·vē·āˑ·shn theˑ·r·pē),
n in Ayurveda, the use of sesame oil or castor oil to remove vata, butter or ghee to remove pitta, and honey to remove kapha. See also dosha, vata, pitta, and kapha.
therapy, animal-assisted,
n technique in which animals are brought into contact with patients who are recovering; provides touch, builds connection, empathy, and enjoyment.
therapy, antihomotoxic,
n therapeutic method that elimates toxins via combination homeopathic remedies. See also homotoxicology and toxin.
therapy, antiretroviral (ART) (anˈ·tī·reˈ·trō·vīˑ·rl theˑ·r·pē),
n a combination drug treatment used to suppress HIV virus levels and activity in AIDS patients. See also HAART.
therapy, aura-soma (ōrˈ·-sōˑ·m theˑ·r·pē),
n a structured color therapy involving interpretation of the patient's choice of four out of 101 dual-colored bottles containing herbal extracts and essential oils (“Equilibrium oils”). The contents of the chosen bottle are applied to the skin. Also called
aura-soma color therapy.
therapy, autogenic,
n mental health therapy in which the patient concentrates on selected verbal stimuli to reach a self-induced state of relaxation. Used in pain management, panic attacks, control of nausea, and vomiting resulting from chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Not advised for patients with acute psychoses or personality disorder. See also biofeedback.
therapy, autohemic,
n therapy that involves treating a patient with nosodes prepared from the patient's blood sample or a pooled sample from several patients. Occasionally the patient's blood is mixed with homeopathic potencies before admini-stration. Also called
autosanguine therapy.
therapy, autologous blood (ô·tolˑ··gs bludˑ theˑ·r·pē),
n practice of removing blood from the veins and injecting it into the muscles of the same individual to treat persistent ailments. Has been used for psoriasis, eczema, and asthma. Possible side effects include infection, bruising, and pain.
therapy, autoregulatory,
n therapeutic method that stimulates the patient's innate ability to heal, as when a healing touch removes blockages or constrictions within the body's energy flow. Therapy that frees the body to heal itself. See also medicine, natural.
therapy, bee-sting,
n the use of venom derived from bees for medicinal purposes; used in the treatment of skin, pulmonary, rheumatologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, sensory, psychological, and endocrine conditions. It has also been used to treat bacterial and viral infections; administered by a variety of methods. Persistent nodular lesions and allergic reactions are a concern. Also called
therapy, bee venom and
BVT.
therapy, behavior,
n branch of psychotherapy that emphasizes modifying specific behaviors. Sessions include analysis of a behavior and devising ways to change it to a more desirable response.
therapy, behavioral music,
n therapy that uses music to affect nonmusical behavior; developed from behavior modification theory to facilitate social and cognitive learning and operant conditioning.
therapy, biodynamic (bīˈ·ō·dī·namˑ ik theˑ·r·pē),
n pr. a mind-body–integrated therapy developed by Gerda Boyesen, a Norwegian physiotherapist; uses a variety of methods such as massage, talking, sensory awareness, and meditation to refresh the body. Also called the
Gerda Boyesen technique or
biodynamic psychology.
therapy, biofield,
n any healing practice that addresses the patient's biofield, uses the biofield of the practitioner, or a combination of both. See also biofield, reiki, and therapeutic touch.
therapy, biological,
n a therapeutic modality that uses the biological response modifier, part of the body's immune system, to fight disease and infection or to protect from the side effects of other treatments. Also called
biological response modifier therapy, biotherapy, BRM therapy, or
immunotherapy.
therapy, Block integrative nutritional (blôkˑ inˑ·t·grāˈ·tiv nōō·triˑ·sh·nl theˑ·r·pē),
n a dietary system, developed by Keith Block, MD, that recommends 50% to 70% complex carbohydrates, 10% to 25% percent fat, and the remaining percentage as protein in the diet. The primary objective of this regimen is decreasing and subsequently removing dairy, refined sugars, and meat from one's diet while increasing the number of calories from complex carbohydrates such as vegetables, whole grains, and fruits. Also called
BINT.
therapy, body-oriented,
n form of psychotherapy that holds that emotions are encoded in the body as areas of restriction and tension; movement, breathing, and manual therapy are used to release such emotions.
therapy, breathing biofeedback,
n a biofeedback therapy in which sensors are placed on the patient's abdomen and chest to observe and measure the rhythm, location, volume, and rate of airflow by which the patient learns deep abdominal breathing; used for respiratory conditions, hyperventilation, asthma, and anxiety.
therapy, Callahan Techniques-thought field (CT-TFT),
n.pr developed by clinical psychologist Dr. Roger Callahan, therapy that draws on specific energy meridian points in a particular progression in order to eliminate the cause of negative emotions, as well as their effects on health.
therapy, Cancell,
n an unconventional cancer treatment containing sodium sulfite, potassium hydroxide, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and catechol.
therapy, cell,
n a treatment for cancer in which embryonic animal cells from tissues or organs corresponding to those with the cancer are injected into the cancer patient, with the understanding that these healthy cells are incorporated into the organ, thus repairing or replacing the cancerous cells. This treatment may have side effects, including infections, serious immune responses to the foreign proteins in the cells, and death. Since 1984 the FDA has banned the importation of all injectable cell-therapy materials. Also called
cellular suspensions, cellular therapy, embryonic cell therapy, fresh cell therapy, glandular therapy, live cell therapy, organotherapy, or
sicca cell therapy.
therapy, Cell Specific Cancer,
n.pr a treatment used for cancer, offered in the Dominican Republic, in which the client is exposed to a donut-shaped magnetic device (with an electromagnetic field weaker than in MRI) that allegedly reduces the cancer burden (i.e., destroys enough cancer cells) so that the immune system can take care of the remainder.
therapy, chelation (kē·lāˑ·shn theˑ·r·pē),
n 1., removal of heavy metals, such as lead, iron, and mercury, through the use of chelating agents, usually given intravenously.
2., the purported removal of heavy metals, plaque, and other toxins through intravenous infusion of EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), a synthetic amino acid and chelating agent.
therapy, cognitive,
n treatment that seeks to change behavior (i.e., habits) by addressing the underlying beliefs that drive the behaviors. Comparable to and often used in concert with behavioral therapy.
therapy, cognitive behavioral,
n psychotherapeutic approach used to alter thinking and behavior.
therapy, cold laser,
n treatment with lasers made from helium-neon or gallium aluminum arsenide and used to treat a host of neurologic problems including carpal tunnel syndrome, migraines, arthritis, vertigo, and soft tissue injuries. Also called
low-level light therapy (LLLT).
therapy, colon,
n the use of professionally administered whole-bowel enemas combined with analysis of fecal chemistry, evaluation of environmental and psychologic factors in the patient's life, and regular exercise to maintain bowel health. Based on the belief that the health of the colon is directly related to the health of the whole body and that poor colon health can manifest as a variety of illnesses. Also called
colonic hydrotherapy or
colonic irrigation.
therapy, color,
n the use of color, particularly in interior furnishings and decoration, to help relieve phy-sical and psychologic problems by rectifiying imbalances in the energy flow of the body. See also feng shui.
therapy, complementary,
n 1., any remedy paired with another.
2., treatment used in conjunction with and integrated with traditional Western medicine. This type of therapy is contrasted with alternative medicine, which is used independently of conventional medicine. See also therapy, adjuvant; medicine, complementary; and medicine, conventional.
therapy, cranial manipulative,
n treatment of the tissues and fluids of the skull to correct body rhythms and induce self-healing.
therapy, craniosacral,
n the practice of using one's hands to assess the rhythms of the tissues and fluids in the skull area and to direct those rhythms into healthful patterns. A version of cranial osteopathy sometimes conducted by nondoctors, including massage therapists and physical therapists.
therapy, creative arts,
n the integration of artistic abilities into therapy to alleviate patients' suffering. Activities include but are not limited to drawing, painting, dancing, poetry writing, singing, and gardening.
therapy, creative music,
n therapeutic use of improvisational music to encourage stimulation and development of “musical intelligence,” confidence, and self-actualization. Psychodynamic and humanistic theories are often used. Also called
Nordoff-Robbins improvisational music therapy.
therapy, crystal,
n the use of quartz crystal energy with a person's energy to facilitate a cascade of spiritual, mental, emotional, and physical changes simultaneously or following a hierarchy of cure.
therapy, dance,
n integrative movement therapy that encourages awareness, feeling, and enhanced self-esteem. See also authentic movement.
therapy, desensitization,
n therapy used for the prevention of serious allergic responses, in which the patient is regularly injected with increasing doses of a purified allergen to reduce the sensitivity of the immune system to that allergen.
therapy, detoxification,
n a collection of various means for detoxification, including chelation, colonic irrigation, fasting, herbal cleansing, and nutritional cleansing. These treatments are intended to help the body's natural eliminative functions. See also chelation therapy, colon therapy, and fasting.
therapy, Di Bella,
n.pr method used for cancer treatment that employs substances such as bromocriptine, melatonin, and retinoid solution.
therapy, differentiation,
n cancer treatment that aims to stimulate cancer cells beyond their undifferentiated state to differentiate like normal cells to halt their uncontrolled proliferation.
therapy, digitalis,
n the use of digitalis glycosides to increase the heart's rate of contractions and speed. This protocol can decrease the conduction speed of the atrioventricular node and create negative dromotropy, thus leading to heartbeat irregularities.
therapy, distraction,
n approach that uses enjoyable thoughts and activities as a distraction from the pain and discomfort of disease and treatment.
Enlarge picture
Therapy, distraction.
therapy, drainage,
n purging of toxins by means of low potency dosages of homeopathic remedies related to the afflicted organs. See also therapy, antihomotoxic; organ affinity; and organotherapy.
therapy, EDTA,
n technique that employs intravenous transfusions containing disodium EDTA (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid) to remove minerals, toxins, and other substances from the blood and vessels. No known risks if used properly. Also called
chelation.
therapy, electrodermal activity (i·lekˈ·trō·derˑ·ml ak·tiˑ·vi·tē theˑ·r·pē),
n procedure for measuring minute amounts of perspiration that would be otherwise too subtle to detect. Sensors are placed on the palms or fingerpads of the patient and the electric current produced measures the skin conductance. Also used to treat hyperhidrosis and anxiety.
therapy, enzyme,
n treatment system developed by Max Wolf, MD, in the 1930s using orally ingested enzymes derived from animals and plants to address enzyme deficiency and several illnesses.
therapy, equine,
n treatment of mental and physical conditions through therapeutic interactions (e.g., riding) with horses. Also called
hippotherapy, riding therapy, or
therapeutic riding. See also therapy, animal-assisted.
therapy, fever,
n induction of fever for healing purposes using herbal, biological, or mechanical (e.g., hot baths) preparations. Also called
pyretotherapy.
therapy, finger pulse,
n biofeedback therapy in which the rate and force of the pulse are measured and used for controlling anxiety, hyperten-sion, cardiac arrhythmia, and other conditions.
therapy, flotation (flō·tāˑ·shn theˑ·r·ë),
n method used in transpersonal medicine that allows an individual to attain altered states of consciousness by facilitating flotation in a saline-filled tank while sound and light are diminished or eliminated to effect physic and psychologic isolation. See also medicine, transpersonal.
therapy, frequency,
n the use of specific high-frequency oscillations to destroy pathogenic organisms or cancerous cells and restore health. Also called
energoinformational therapy or
Rife frequency therapy.
therapy, gem,
n See healing, crystal.
therapy, gene,
n therapy in which genes are introduced into the patient in order to cure or treat a disease. Also called
somatic cell gene therapy.
therapy, Gerson,
n.pr an unorthodox anticancer treatment that includes a diet that comprises vegetables and fruits with nutritional supplements, liver extract injections, and coffee enemas.
therapy, Gestalt,
n.pr a method of humanistic psychotherapy that examines the present emotions of the patient without consideration to the past to gain a new level of self-awareness. Instead of explaining the meaning of these emotions, the therapist works with the patient to elucidate his or her own understanding of these feelings.
therapy, Gestalt art,
n.pr a group-oriented, process-driven form of art therapy created by Janie Rhyne and based on the humanistic Gestalt psychology of Fritz Perls.
therapy, glandular,
n a treatment in which tissue extracts of organs such as spleen, thymus, adrenal glands, or liver are used orally to help with a number of conditions, including asthma, autoimmune diseases, cancer, chronic fatigue, cystic fibrosis, eczema, inflammatory diseases, low white cell count, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions.
therapy, group,
n a form of therapy wherein people meet with each other and a therapist in order to interact and discuss their problems.
therapy, hallucinogen (h·lōōˑ·si·nō·jin theˑ·r·pē),
n therapy that uses lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) to decrease dependence on drugs such as alcohol or cocaine.
therapy, heat,
n use of heat on all or part of the body to encourage hyperemia, increase circulation, facilitate sweating, and relax muscles. Used in sports and rehabilitation medicine and as a cancer treatment.
therapy, homotoxic (hōˈ·m·tôkˑ·sik theˑ·r·pē),
n a form of homeopathy in which the same substance that causes an illness is also used to treat the symptoms. Also called
homeopathy, autoisopathy, and
tautopathy.
therapy, hormone replacement,
n a method for treating symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes, decreased sexual desire, vaginal dryness, sleep disorders, and mood swings by using estrogen alone or in combination with progestin.
therapy, horticultural,
n a subcategory of nature-assisted therapy focused on gardening and horticultural activities for therapeutic benefits.
therapy, humor,
n a means of enhancing a patient's ability to recognize, express, and enjoy humor. Used to help patients learn, express anger, relieve tensions, or manage painful emotions. See also therapy, laughter.
therapy, hyperbaric oxygen (hīˈ·per·beˑ·rik okˑ·s·jin theˑ·r·pē),
n therapeutic use of highly pressurized oxygen in the treatment of clostridial myonecrosis, osteoradionecrosis, skin graft healing, stroke rehabilitation, and other conditions.
therapy, hyperoxygenation,
n a cancer treatment based on the belief that hypoxia and resulting anaerobic metabolism promote the growth of cancerous cells. In these therapies, the patient is treated with oxygenating agents, such as germanium sesquioxide, hydrogen peroxide, or ozone. Germanium compounds can have lethal nephrotoxicity. Also called
bio-oxidative therapy or
oxidative therapy.
therapy, hyperthermia (hīˈ·per·therˑ·mē·),
n the use of heat either systemically or locally.
therapy, immunoaugmentive (IAT) (iˈ·my·nō·ôg·menˑ·tiv theˑ·r·pē),
n Developed by Dr. Lawrence Burton, an alternative adjunctive treatment for cancer, uses four separate blood proteins and proposes improvement in immune system functioning as its mechanism.
therapy, insight-oriented,
n psychotherapy based upon the idea that behaviors have their roots in a client's family dynamics, instinctual drives, childhood development, and genetic traits. Therapy in this vein consists of delving into these areas for information resulting in treatment of disorders.
therapy, Irlen lens,
n.pr a treatment for scotopic sensitivity, a condition of “perceptual stress” accompanying autism and some learning disorders. In this therapy, the patient wears lenses that have been tinted to a specific color to minimize or eliminate their sensitivity.
therapy, Jacobson's Progressive Relaxation,
n.pr a method of relaxation in which undesirable muscle tension, even if barely detectable, is systematically identified and relaxed. The eventual goal is for a state in which all undesirable tension is eliminated.
therapy, juice,
n juices of raw fruits and vegetables administered to detoxify and provide easily assimilated concentrated nutrition.
therapy, Kelley/Gonzalez metabolic,
n.pr cancer treatments involving dietary modifications, detoxification through coffee enemas, and nutritional and enzymatic supplementation (the Kelley variant also includes neurologic stimulation through cranial or spinal manipulation and biblically-based prayer). The treatments are tailored for each patient based on a computerized method of metabolic typing (Kelley) or analysis of the hair and blood (Gonzalez).
therapy, Kneipp,
n See Kneippkur.
therapy, Koryo hand (kōr·yō),
n.pr Korean microsystem of hand acupuncture that views the hand as a map for the whole body and the meridians. In this system, the middle finger is analogous to the midline of the body; the adjacent fingers represent the arms and the thumb and little finger as the legs. The posterior of the body corresponds to the dorsal surface of the hand, and the anterior corresponds to the palmar surface. Stimulation methods for these regions include pressure pellets, needles, rings, moxa, and fingertip pressure.
therapy, laughter,
n the use of laughter as an aid in enhancing the patient's psychologic state. See also therapy, humor.
therapy, light,
n a therapeutic modality in which disease is treated with light. The light may be natural (i.e., full-spectrum) or of specific wavelengths (e.g., colored light, low-intensity lasers, ultraviolet light). See also therapy, photodynamic and phototherapy.
therapy, low-energy emission,
n treatment for insomnia in which electromagnetic fields (low amplitude–modulated) are applied directly to oral mucosa by means of a mouthpiece.
therapy, low-level light (LLLT),
n treatment that employs lasers made from helium-neon or gallium aluminum; used to treat a host of neurological problems including carpal tunnel syndrome, migraines, arthritis, vertigo, and soft tissue injuries. Also called
therapy, cold laser.
therapy, magnetic,
n therapeutic application of magnets placed on the surface of the skin.
therapy, magnetic field (mag·neˑ·tik fēld' theˑ·r·pē),
n technique in which magnets are placed on the body to treat a variety of conditions.
therapy, manner metabolic,
n.pr See therapy, metabolic.
therapy, manual,
n physical approaches in complementary medicine including but not limited to body work, chiropractic, tui na, and shiatsu. Therapies range from basic manual manipulations derived from osteopathy, reiki, and qi gong to energy work.
therapy, marma (märˑ·m theˑ·r·pē),
n in Ayurveda, massage therapy used to heal certain illnesses related to muscles, ligaments, and the nervous system. See also marmas.
therapy, medical art,
n the use and making of art by patients who are physically sick or undergoing chemotherapy, radical surgery, or living with trauma to their bodies; therapeutically assists patients to process pain and death, and also facilitates restoration of health.
therapy, megavitamin,
n See medicine, orthomolecular.
therapy, meridian,
n a therapeutic approach that involves palpation of the acupuncture meridian systems; includes the extraordinary meridians or secondary vessels.
therapy, metabolic,
n a treatment for cancer and other serious illnesses; regards the build-up of toxins as the primary cause of chronic, degenerative diseases. Specific treatments vary but typically include enemas, wholes food diets, nutritional supplementation, laetrile, and glandular extracts.
therapy, microwave-resonance,
n a technique that uses specific, low-intensity radiation in the microwave range to improve a variety of medical conditions. Used to treat arthritis, cerebral palsy, chronic pain, esopha-gitis, hypertension, neurologic disorders, and side effects of chemotherapy.
therapy, milieu (mil·yōōˑ theˑ·r·pē),
n in psychiatry, treatment that involves manipulating a patient's environment for therapeutic reasons.
therapy, monopolar direct current,
n a treatment performed within a doctor's office that uses electrical current to shrink tissues. Used to treat hemorrhoids and other conditions.
therapy, movement,
n any form of physical activity used to produce a therapeutic effect in the patient, such as exercise, dance, yoga, or martial arts.
therapy, music,
n See therapy, creative music.
therapy, nature-assisted,
n a therapy that uses plants, natural materials, and environment to hasten healing and improve the quality of life.
therapy, neural (nyurˑ·l theˑ·r·pē),
n method of treatment in which an anesthetic is injected into painful areas to effect pain relief from chronic conditions.
therapy, neuroelectric (nerˈ·ō··lekˑ·trik theˑ·r·pē),
n electrical stimulation of the mastoid region with low-level alternating current through surface electrodes. Used as a treatment for insomnia. Also called
electrosleep.
therapy, nondirective,
n professional counseling style marked by an atmosphere of help and assistance between therapist and client.
therapy, nutritional,
n therapy based on the idea that an individual's health is directly related to his or her diet and nutrient intake.
therapy, oral antigen,
n a method of treatment for multiple sclerosis that involves administering myelin basic protein orally. See also multiple sclerosis.
therapy, orthomolecular psychiatric (ōrˈ·thō·m·lekˑ·y·ler sīˈ·kē·aˑ·trik theˑ·r·pē),
n psychiatric treatment that provides optimal concentrations of nutrients, such as vitamins and essential fatty acids. Low con-centrations in the brain of these substances are thought to cause symptoms of mental illness.
therapy, oxygen (äksˑ··jin theˑ·r·pē),
n process that administers oxygen by face mask or hyperbaric chamber to relieve hypoxia associated with a variety of conditions. Possible risks include toxicity, infection, and embolism. See also therapy, hyperbari cand embolism.
therapy, ozone (ōˑ·zōn theˑ·r·pē),
n treatment that involves injecting the body with ozone or hydrogen peroxide to treat cancer, HIV/AIDS, and other degenerative conditions. Risks include infection, embolism, and hemolysis.
therapy, peloid,
n treatment in which pulp (usually from lake or sea mud, peat, or other plants) is applied to the body for its therapeutic benefits.
therapy, pet,
n treatment involving contact between a patient and pet (i.e., dog, cat, etc.).
therapy, phage,
n treatment which uses viruses that attack only bacteria; attempts to rid the body of pathogens. Advantages of phages over antibiotics include their ability to increase in numbers and spread throughout the body as well as their potential to attack antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
therapy, photodynamic (fōˈ·tō·dī·naˑ·mik theˑ·r·pē),
n form of light therapy that involves injection of irradiated pigments into tissues that are then irradiated further with certain light frequencies designed to destroy cancer cells or change conditions like macular degeneration.
therapy, poetry,
n reading and/or composing poetry with the intention of affecting therapeutic change or personal development. Promotes creativity, imagination, spontaneity, appreciation of beauty, and expression of emotion. See also bibliotherapy.
therapy, polarity (pō·larˑ·i·tē theˑ·r·pē),
n approach developed by Randolph Stone; combines Eastern and Western energy modalities to release the blockages underlying disease and restore homeostasis.
therapy, positional release,
therapy, psychodynamic (sīˈ·k·dī·naˑ·mik theˑ·r·pē),
n emotional healing method derived from psychoanalysis, the goal of which is assisting patients to identify and settle conflicts that began in childhood and remain unresolved.
therapy, pulsed electromagnetic field,
n a healing technique in which a small, electronic device that delivers weak pulse signals is used to speed healing.
therapy, purification,
therapy, reconstructive,
n injection treatment for arthritis that delivers nutritional substances into the tissues surrounding the joint to increase fibroblast activity.
therapy, reflex zone,
n a method of manipulative therapy applying touch to the back, feet, hands, or head to elicit therapeutic changes in reflected tissues and organs. Also called
RZT. See also reflexology.
therapy, regenerative injection,
therapy, rejuvenation,
n in Ayurveda, the use of specific activities, herbs, and foods for the purpose of preventing the aging process and promoting longevity.
therapy, relaxation,
n a set of techniques designed to calm the body and mind to produce relaxation in response to stressful situations. Meditation, progressive relaxation, prayer, biofeedback, and self-hypnosis are common examples.
therapy, release,
n therapeutic approach used in pediatric psychotherapy to treat children affected with anxiety and stress that is associated with a particular recent event.
therapy, restricted environmental stimulation,
n sensory-deprivation procedure designed to produce a nonreactive state and stimulate healing.
therapy, SHEN,
n a modern version of ancient hands-on healing techniques in which a practitioner works to facilitate normal flow of energy by applying light pressure to specific areas of the body. Used to relieve chronic pain and dissipate psychological distress and emotional blockage.
therapy, single remedy,
n in homeopathy, treatment that uses a remedy that contains only one ingredient that most closely matches the individual's profile of symptoms.
therapy, sleep restriction,
n a treatment for sleep disorders in which the patient spends only as much time in bed as is necessary for sleep (e.g., a person who only sleeps four hours every night would only be in bed for four hours, instead of tossing and turning for four hours and sleeping for four). Restriction of bed time is believed to increase the amount of the actual sleep time.
therapy, spinal manual,
n encompasses a host of hands-on processes employed by chiropractors to correct spinal misalignments that are often the source of common complaints such as neck pain, back pain, and headaches. Also called
SMT.
therapy, step,
n process in which a patient is first treated with an inexpensive treatment that works for the majority of patients with that particular complaint. If that treatment fails, the patient is stepped up to a more powerful and/or expensive treatment.
therapy, stimulus control,
n a treatment for sleep disorders in which the bed and bedroom are associated solely with sleeping and, if applicable, sex. If the patient is not asleep within a set time, he or she is to leave the bedroom and not return until he or she is sleepy. Regular waking times are also emphasized, regardless of the amount of sleep obtained during the night.
therapy, supportive,
n branch of psychotherapy aimed at treating individuals in crisis situations. The focus is on developing tools to cope with overwhelming situations.
therapy, symptomatic (simp·t·maˑ·tik theˑ·r·pē),
n 1., therapy aimed at treating the symptoms of a condition.
2., form of acupuncture in which needles are inserted near or surrounding the area of complaint. Differs from typical acupuncture because classic acupuncture points are not used.
therapy, systems,
n branch of psychotherapy with an emphasis on resolving relationship problems. Based on theory that individuals act within the family system as a whole.
therapy, thermal biofeedback,
n biofeedback that measures the temperature of the skin to index blood flow changes as the vessels dilate and constrict.
therapy, thought field (TFT),
n form of therapy used to treat psychologic problems in which the client taps on his own energy meridian points in a particular and distinct progression while recalling painful memories, thus alleviating negative emotions and the related ill effects on the client's health. TFT was developed by clinical psychologist Dr. Roger Callahan. Also called
Callahan Techniques thought field therapy.
therapy, traditional Chinese dietary,
n in traditional Chinese medicine, therapeutic approach that involves the consumption of specific foods to treat specific illnesses. Often done without consulting with a practitioner.
therapy, viral,
n the approach of using viruses genetically modified to transmit genetic material to specific sites.
therapy, virilization,
n See vajikarana.
therapy, Zoetron,
n.pr See therapy, cell specific cancer.
therapy, zone,
n a therapeutic scheme that divides the body into ten vertically interconnected segments, or zones, with an understanding that tension or blockage in one part of a zone is reflected in the zone as a whole.

ther·a·py

(thār'ă-pē)
Treatment of disease or disorder by any method.
Synonym(s): therapeusis (2) .
[G. therapeia, medical treatment]

therapy (ther´əpē),

n the treatment of disease, injury, or illness.
therapy, antibiotic,
n the treatment of disease states by the local or systemic administration of antibodies.
therapy, antimicrobial,
n a treatment modality that attacks the microorganisms responsible for a specific disease or condition.
therapy, chlorhexidine chip,
n controlled delivery of the antimicrobial agent chlorhexidine in which a tiny, biodegradable dose of the drug is inserted into the periodontal pocket, where it continues to slowly release medication for approximately 7 to 10 days before disintegrating. This therapy is a means of attacking periodontal infection at its source without systemic involvement.
therapy, compromise periodontal maintenance,
n a program of continuing periodontal treatment designed to slow disease progression in patients for whom surgery is not an option because of specific health concerns or economic restrictions.
therapy, doxycycline polymer,
n delivery via syringe and cannula of a biodegradable liquid form of the antimicrobial agent doxycycline polymer directly into a periodontal pocket. The medication hardens upon contact with moisture, thus sealing the pocket and allowing the agent to destroy periodontal pathogens as it dissolves.
therapy, growth modification,
n a treatment employed to modify the growth of the jaw or other bones as they are still developing, usually to treat cases of malocclusion.
therapy, hormonal replacement,
n the administration of synthetic female hormones in order to ease the negative impacts of losing these hormones due to menopause, hysterectomy, or disease.
therapy, indirect pulpal,
n the application of a drug that heals the pulpal cells beneath a layer of sound or carious dentin, as in a moderately deep preparation for a restoration.
therapy, megavoltage radiation,
n a form of radiation therapy used in the treatment of oral cancer. It delivers a more precise point of contact than other forms.
therapy, myofunctional (myotherapeutic exercises),
n the use of muscle exercises as an adjunct to mechanical correction of malocclusion.
therapy, oxygen,
n the providing of additional oxygen for patients who need it.
therapy, periodontal,
n the treatment of the periodontal lesion. Such therapy has two principal objectives: the eradication or arrest of the periodontal lesion with correction or cure of the deformity created by it, and the alteration in the oral cavity of the periodontal climate that was conducive or contributory to the periodontal breakdown.
therapy, periodontal, maintenance phase,
n the part of periodontal therapy that is necessary for the preservation of the results obtained during active therapy and for the prevention of further periodontal disease; an extension of active periodontal therapy, requiring the combined efforts of both the periodontist and the patient.
therapy, pharmacotherapeutic nonsurgical pocket
n the use of both systemic and topical antibiotic compounds to fight bacterial infections in periodontal pockets.
therapy, pocket,
n the debridement or removal of deposits and endotoxins from the periodontal pocket in order to begin the healing process.
therapy, pulp canal,
therapy putty,
n a malleable, doughlike substance used in hand exercises to enhance the force and control of the hand muscles.
therapy, radiation (radiotherapy),
n the treatment of disease with a type of radiation.
therapy, radiation, external beam,
n a treatment for cancer in which a beam of high- or low-yield radiation is directed from outside the body at the site of the cancerous tumor or lesion; may cause unnecessary radiation to normal tissues.
therapy, radiation, internal,
n a treatment for cancer in which the radiation source takes the form of an interstitial implant. It is placed in the body among the affected tissues to provide a directed dose of radiation that is not possible using external methods.
therapy, radiation, orthovoltage,
n a form of cancer treatment in which a beam of low-yield radiation is directed from outside the body at a superficial lesion, such as those found in the oral cavity or on the lips.
therapy, radiation, supervoltage,
n See therapy, radiation, megavoltage.
therapy, replacement,
n the administration, as a therapeutic agent, of an essential constituent in which the body is deficient (e.g., insulin in diabetes mellitus).
therapy, root canal,
therapy, speech,
n the science that deals with the use of procedures, training, and remedies for the cure, alleviation, or prevention of speech disorders.

therapy

the treatment of disease; therapeutics. See also treatment.

animal-assisted therapy
the treatment of humans, usually for mental or psychological illness, which incorporates familiarization with a companion or pleasure animal. Called also pet-facilitated or pet-assisted therapy. See also animal facilitated therapy.
anticoagulant therapy
the use of drugs to render the blood sufficiently incoagulable to discourage thrombosis.
heat therapy
see hyperthermia (2).
immunosuppressive therapy
treatment with agents, such as x-rays, corticosteroids and cytotoxic chemicals, which suppress the immune response to antigen(s); used in organ transplantation, autoimmune disease, allergy, multiple myeloma, etc.
inhalation therapy
see aerosol.
neoadjuvant therapy
given before the primary treatment, such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy, radiation therapy.
oxygen therapy
the administration of supplemental oxygen to relieve hypoxemia and prevent damage to the tissue cells as a result of oxygen lack (hypoxia). See also oxygen therapy.
physical therapy
use of physical agents and methods in rehabilitation and restoration of normal bodily function after illness or injury; it includes massage and manipulation, therapeutic exercises, hydrotherapy, and various forms of energy (electrotherapy, actinotherapy and ultrasound). See also physical therapist.
radiation therapy
treatment of disease by means of ionizing radiation. See also radiotherapy.
replacement therapy
treatment to replace deficient formation or loss of body products by administration of the natural body products or synthetic substitutes.
serum therapy
serotherapy; treatment of disease by injection of serum from immune animals.
substitution therapy
the administration of a hormone to compensate for glandular deficiency.
vaporization therapy
see aerosol.

Patient discussion about therapy

Q. What is the Treatment for Anemia? I would like to know what are the possible treatments for anemia?

A. The first step in treating anemia, is discovering the cause for it. By a series of simple blood tests it is easy to discover iron defficiency, folic acid defficiency and vitamin B12 defficiency anemia, all which can be treated with oral supplements or a change of nutrition. Anemia that is associated with rectal bleeding should be further investigated, because it is often the first sign of colon polyps or colon cancer. Colonoscopy is then recommended.

Q. What Is the Treatment for Dysentery? My son has been suffering from dysentery as of this morning. What is the recommended treatment?

A. Dysentery treatment should include both proper fluid intake to regain the volume that has lost, and proper medications to treat the possible causes- bacterial or parasite infection. Viral infections usually do not cause dysentery. At any signs of dehydration, it is important to seek medical care.

Q. Does omega-3 interfere with diabetes treatment? I’m a 55 years old man, and was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, along with high lipid levels several years ago. A couple of months ago I read that omega-3 can protect your heart and brain, so I started to take omega-3 pills every day. Yesterday I read in some website that omega-3 can interfere with the drugs I take to treat my diabetes- Is that right?

A. Omega-3 doesn’t influence the treatment of your diabetes, and since you have high lipids, that can contribute to some of the damage diabetes does to your body, omega-3, that may lower the lipid level in your may actually help you treat yourself overall better. However - consult your doctor. Better be safe than sorry...

More discussions about therapy