compress

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Related to compressive: Compressive stress, compressive strain, compressive force, compressive myelopathy

compress

 [kom´pres]
a pad of gauze or similar dressing, for application of pressure or medication to a restricted area, or for local applications of heat or cold.

com·press

(kom'pres),
A pad of gauze or other material applied for local pressure.
[L. com-primo, pp. -pressus, to press together]

compress

/com·press/ (kom´pres) a pad or bolster of folded linen or other material, applied with pressure; sometimes medicated, it may be wet or dry, or hot or cold.

compress

(kəm-prĕs′)
tr.v. com·pressed, com·pressing, com·presses
1. To press together: compressed her lips.
2. To make more compact by or as if by pressing.
n. (kŏm′prĕs′)
Medicine A soft pad of gauze or other material applied with pressure to a part of the body to control hemorrhage or to supply heat, cold, moisture, or medication to alleviate pain or reduce infection.

com·press′i·bil′i·ty n.
com·press′i·ble (kəm-prĕs′ə-bəl) adj.

compress

[kom′pres]
Etymology: L, comprimere, to press together
a soft pad, usually made of cloth, used to apply heat, cold, or medication to the surface of a body area. A compress also may be applied over a wound to help control bleeding. Compare dressing.

compress

noun A pad of folded gauze that may be applied with pressure to an area of skin and held in place for a period of time—e.g., to cover an open wound or stop bleeding; they can be cold or hot, moist or dry.

verb To apply pressure.

compress

A pad of folded gauze, which may be applied with pressure to an area of skin and held in place for a period of time–eg, to cover an open wound or stop bleeding; compresses can be cold or hot; moist or dry. See Cold compress, Hot compress.

com·press

(kom'pres)
A pad of gauze or other material applied for local pressure.
[L. com-primo, pp. -pressus, to press together]

compress

A pad of gauze or other material firmly applied to a part of the body to apply heat, cold or medication or to control bleeding (haemorrhage).

compress,

n a method of medicine preparation in which a large cloth is soaked in a hot infusion or decoction; the excess liquid wrung out; and the cloth applied to the affected part of the body.
compress, cold,
n a cloth or pad soaked in cold water or ice (sometimes containing herbs or specific solutes) and applied on a part of the body. In hydrotherapy, used as a single compress to reduce blood flow and as a double compress to increase blood flow.
compress, hot,
n a cloth or pad moistened in warm to hot water and applied to a part of the body. In hydrotherapy, used to ease pain locally, increase blood flow, and relax muscles.

compress

a square of gauze or similar dressing, for application of pressure or medication to a restricted area, or for local applications of heat or cold.
References in periodicals archive ?
on the feasibility of the maximum cross-section of at least 22 square meters in rocks of minimum compressive strength Rc = 80 MPa from one setting to combine the mining authority and power of 130 kW +/- 5%;
Compressive strength was conducted on 100mm cubes according to BS EN 12390-3.
The objective of the present investigation is to evaluate high strain rate behavior of alumina nanoparticle filled epoxy resin using compressive SHPB apparatus.
Figure 3 shows the results of compressive strength of mortars after standard and autoclave curing.
For accelerated construction projects requiring high compressive strengths within day, an epoxy grout and an ultra-high-performance concrete displayed acceptable properties.
Working with Cardiff and Vale University Health Board (UHB) researchers collected and analysed data relating to the compressive forces acting on the knee joint from 20 people who were taught techniques to run forwards and backwards.
The uniaxial oriented compressive reinforced PVA-H with high water content was produced as follows (Fig 1).
Laymon examined the impact a lower leg compression garment made by Zensah-basically, a more compressive tall sock that begins just above the ankle and goes a little below the knee-had on a runner's running mechanics and running economy.
Estimating the compressive strength of the underground is a complicate matter due to the test is a destructive one and is quite impossible to correlate the results obtained on a batch of samples to the bulk underground.