compression neuropathy

com·pres·sion neu·rop·a·thy

a focal nerve lesion produced when sustained pressure is applied to a localized portion of the nerve, either from an external or internal source; the main source of injury is the pressure differential that exists between one portion of the nerve and another.

compression neuropathy

any of several disorders involving damage to sensory nerve roots or peripheral nerves, caused by mechanical pressure or localized trauma. Compression neuropathy is characterized by paresthesia, weakness, or paralysis. The carpal, peroneal, radial, and ulnar nerves are most commonly involved. Compare neuritis. See also paresthesia.

com·pres·sion neu·rop·a·thy

(kŏm-presh'ŭn nūr-op'ă-thē)
A focal nerve lesion produced when sustained pressure is applied to a localized portion of the nerve, either from an external or internal source.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the development of a compression neuropathy, both ischemic and mechanical factors have a role [38].
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a common compression neuropathy of the median nerve associated with many conditions including diabetes.
It is second only to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome as a compression neuropathy.
His impression was that the patient had possible compression neuropathy, and he ordered non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, a brace, and follow-up in ten days.
This paradigm examined in animal models revealed that the onset of compression neuropathy in healthy animals took several months versus a few weeks in animals with an underlying neuropathy; this latter compression lesion was more severe (Hopkins and Morgan-Hughes 1969).
A compression neuropathy is a condition involving pressure usually affecting a superficial nerve in and around bony prominences (Berkow, 1987).