compress

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compress

 [kom´pres]
a pad of gauze or similar dressing, for application of pressure or medication to a restricted area, or for local applications of heat or cold.

com·press

(kom'pres),
A pad of gauze or other material applied for local pressure.
[L. com-primo, pp. -pressus, to press together]

compress

/com·press/ (kom´pres) a pad or bolster of folded linen or other material, applied with pressure; sometimes medicated, it may be wet or dry, or hot or cold.

compress

(kəm-prĕs′)
tr.v. com·pressed, com·pressing, com·presses
1. To press together: compressed her lips.
2. To make more compact by or as if by pressing.
n. (kŏm′prĕs′)
Medicine A soft pad of gauze or other material applied with pressure to a part of the body to control hemorrhage or to supply heat, cold, moisture, or medication to alleviate pain or reduce infection.

com·press′i·bil′i·ty n.
com·press′i·ble (kəm-prĕs′ə-bəl) adj.

compress

[kom′pres]
Etymology: L, comprimere, to press together
a soft pad, usually made of cloth, used to apply heat, cold, or medication to the surface of a body area. A compress also may be applied over a wound to help control bleeding. Compare dressing.

compress

noun A pad of folded gauze that may be applied with pressure to an area of skin and held in place for a period of time—e.g., to cover an open wound or stop bleeding; they can be cold or hot, moist or dry.

verb To apply pressure.

compress

A pad of folded gauze, which may be applied with pressure to an area of skin and held in place for a period of time–eg, to cover an open wound or stop bleeding; compresses can be cold or hot; moist or dry. See Cold compress, Hot compress.

com·press

(kom'pres)
A pad of gauze or other material applied for local pressure.
[L. com-primo, pp. -pressus, to press together]

compress

A pad of gauze or other material firmly applied to a part of the body to apply heat, cold or medication or to control bleeding (haemorrhage).

compress,

n a method of medicine preparation in which a large cloth is soaked in a hot infusion or decoction; the excess liquid wrung out; and the cloth applied to the affected part of the body.
compress, cold,
n a cloth or pad soaked in cold water or ice (sometimes containing herbs or specific solutes) and applied on a part of the body. In hydrotherapy, used as a single compress to reduce blood flow and as a double compress to increase blood flow.
compress, hot,
n a cloth or pad moistened in warm to hot water and applied to a part of the body. In hydrotherapy, used to ease pain locally, increase blood flow, and relax muscles.

compress

a square of gauze or similar dressing, for application of pressure or medication to a restricted area, or for local applications of heat or cold.
References in classic literature ?
Alexey Alexandrovitch, ready for his speech, stood compressing his crossed fingers, waiting to see if the crack would not come again.
Crisparkle could hardly see anything else of it for a large outside passenger seated on the box, with his elbows squared, and his hands on his knees, compressing the driver into a most uncomfortably small compass, and glowering about him with a strongly-marked face.
Sparsit, suddenly compressing her mouth, 'he had that - honour.
I wonder,' he at length said, compressing his green packet with some force, 'that if it's not worth your while to take care of yourself for your own sake, it's not worth doing for some one else's.
A process for stabilizing a product from a pledget, comprising the steps of: providing a pledget into a compression mold; compressing said pledget in said compression mold to form a compressed pledget; unloading said compressed pledget from said compression mold and loading said compressed pledget into a stabilization mold by a transfer member, whereby said transfer member advances to a loading position; retracting said transfer member to a stabilizing position; stabilizing said compressed pledget in said stabilization mold to form a stabilized product, wherein said transfer member remains in said stabilizing position during at least a portion of the step of stabilizing said compressed pledget; and unloading said stabilized product from said stabilization mold.
Princeton University Library's Digital Map and Geospatial Information Center started a pilot map scanning project in early 2004 to build a system, to develop specifications for scanning maps and compressing TIFF images to JPEG2000 file format, and to establish workflows.
Figure 9 shows contours of the axial stress (component 11) upon compressing the section of seal to 50% of its original height.
Compressing the air causes the air to become very hot, and when this air cools down to a specific temperature, free moisture, or condensate, is released into the air stream.