prothrombin

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Related to component B of prothrombin: Activated prothrombin complex concentrate, Prothrombin complex

prothrombin

 [pro-throm´bin]
a glycoprotein present in the plasma that is converted into thrombin by extrinsic thromboplastin during the second stage of blood clotting; called also factor II.
prothrombin consumption a clinical laboratory test done to determine thromboplastin generating capacity, which provides information about the first stage of blood clotting. When clotting of a normal blood sample occurs, prothrombin is converted to thrombin; thus there should be little or no prothrombin in the serum after the clot is formed. If, however, there is deficiency of blood clotting (coagulation), some of the prothrombin will not be utilized (consumed). Abnormal results of the test are found in deficiencies of the first-stage coagulation factors (factors VIII and IX), and in the presence of circulating anticoagulants, thrombocytopenia, and any other condition leading to inadequate generation of thromboplastin.
prothrombin consumption test a test to measure the formation of intrinsic thromboplastin by determining the residual serum prothrombin after blood clotting is complete.
prothrombin time a test to measure the activity of coagulation factors I, II, V, VII, and X, which participate in the extrinsic pathway of coagulation; abbreviated Pro time or PT. Called also one-stage prothrombin time and Quick's test. Deficiency of any of these factors leads to a prolongation of the one-stage prothrombin times, as will circulating anticoagulants that are active against factors V and VII or against thromboplastin.

The test is considered basic to any study of the clotting process and is also widely used for guidance in establishing and maintaining anticoagulant therapy. Test results are best understood when both the patient's and the control times are reported. The therapeutic range for coagulation therapy is usually 2 to 3 times that of the normal (12 to 15 sec.) control.

pro·throm·bin

(prō-throm'bin),
A glycoprotein, molecular weight approximately 72,500, formed and stored in the parenchymal cells of the liver and present in blood in a concentration of approximately 20 mg/100 mL. In the presence of thromboplastin and calcium ion, prothrombin is converted to thrombin, which in turn converts fibrinogen to fibrin, this process resulting in coagulation of blood; a deficiency of prothrombin leads to impaired blood coagulation.

prothrombin

/pro·throm·bin/ (pro-throm´bin) coagulation factor II.

prothrombin

(prō-thrŏm′bĭn)
n.
A plasma protein that is converted into thrombin during blood clotting.

prothrombin

a plasma protein that is converted to the active form, factor IIa, or thrombin, when cleaved by factor Xa bound to factor Va. Thrombin then cleaves fibrinogen to fibrin, which forms the fibrin clot. Also called factor II.

pro·throm·bin

(prō-throm'bin)
A glycoprotein formed and stored in the parenchymal cells of the liver and present in blood in a concentration of approximately 20 mg/100 mL. In the presence of thromboplastin and calcium ion, prothrombin is converted to thrombin, which in turn converts fibrinogen to fibrin, resulting in coagulation of blood; a deficiency of prothrombin leads to impaired blood coagulation.

prothrombin

A soluble protein in the blood that is converted to the insoluble form thrombin, under the action of the enzyme prothrombinase, at the end of the cascade of events involved in blood clotting. Thrombin is the main ingredient of the blood clot.

prothrombin

see BLOOD CLOTTING.

Prothrombin

Prothrombin is a blood-clotting protein. Injury to a blood vessel produces a signal which triggers the conversion of prothrombin to thrombin. Thrombin is a protein which plays a central role in provoking the assembly of other proteins to form the blood clot.

prothrombin

; factor II a clotting factor; converted (in the presence of thromboplastin and calcium ions) under the influence of prothrombinase, to thrombin; normal prothrombin levels = ~ 20mg/100ml

pro·throm·bin

(prō-throm'bin)
A glycoprotein, formed and stored in the parenchymal cells of the liver and present in blood in a concentration of approximately 20 mg/100 mL; deficiency leads to impaired blood coagulation.

prothrombin (prōthrom´bin),

n a glycoprotein precursor of thrombin that is produced in the liver and is necessary for the coagulation of blood. A prothrombin deficiency is uncommon but may occur in liver disease. Vitamin K is essential for the synthesis of prothrombin.
prothrombin, B,
prothrombin, component A of,
n See factor V.
prothrombin, component B of,
prothrombin time,
n a one-stage test for detecting certain plasma coagulation defects caused by a deficiency of factors V, VII, or X. Thromboplastin and calcium are added to a sample of the patient's plasma and, simultaneously, to a sample from a normal control. The amount of time required for clot formation in both samples is observed. A prolonged prothrombin time indicates deficiency in one of the factors. Normal findings are 11 to 12.5 seconds.

prothrombin

a glycoprotein present in the plasma that is converted into thrombin by extrinsic thromboplastin during the second stage of blood clotting; called also clotting factor II.

prothrombin consumption test
determines thromboplastin generating capacity, which provides information about the first stage of coagulation. When clotting of a normal blood sample occurs, prothrombin is converted to thrombin, thus there should be little or no prothrombin in the serum after the clot is formed. If, however, there is deficiency of blood coagulation, some of the prothrombin will not be utilized (consumed). Abnormal results of the test are found in deficiencies of the first-stage factors of coagulation (factors VIII and IX), and in the presence of circulating anticoagulants, thrombocytopenia, and any other condition leading to inadequate generation of thromboplastin. Called also serum clot time.
prothrombin converting activity
the step in blood coagulation in which factor Xa, together with factor V react with phospholipid in the presence of calcium, activates prothrombin to form thrombin.
prothrombin deficiency
prothrombin time test
a test to measure the activity of clotting factors V, VII and X, prothrombin and fibrinogen. Deficiency of any of these factors leads to a prolongation of the one-stage prothrombin times, as will circulating anticoagulants that are active against factors V, VII, or against thromboplastin. Called also pro-time.
The one-stage (OSPT) test is performed by measuring the time required for clot formation after tissue extract and calcium are added to citrated plasma. Called also Quick's prothrombin test. A two-stage test determines plasma levels of prothrombin by finding the dilution of plasma that clots a standard fibrinogen reagent in a set period of time.
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