compliments

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compliments

A generic term for praise for a job well done (which counterbalances the unofficial and official complaints procedure which create job-related stress).
References in classic literature ?
The compliments of his neighbours were over; he was no longer teased by being wished joy of so sorrowful an event; and the weddingcake, which had been a great distress to him, was all eat up.
But he had at least paid her the implied compliment of addressing that knowledge to herself; and she felt it the more sensibly, from having hitherto found her scientific sympathies with her deceased husband treated with no great respect by the people with whom she came in contact.
When we came within two leagues and a half of the King's court, he sent some messengers with his compliments, and five mules for the chief of our company.
To this unexpected compliment young Morton could do no more than bow in silence, for it was too flattering for a reply--and too true to deny.
Monsieur, on reaching the carriage, was struck by her beauty; he showed his admiration in so marked a manner that the Chevalier de Lorraine shrugged his shoulders as he listened to his compliments, while Buckingham and De Guiche were almost heart-broken.
Compliment everybody upon everything, and especially upon what they haven't got.
I want no such compliments," Hook barked petulantly.
He waited, with exasperating composure, to hear what the proposed compliment might be.
If I had been a young lady in your own rank of life," she went on, "I might have thanked you for paying me a compliment, and have given you a serious answer.
Somehow Anne--who did not notice the rather guilty little start of surprise the white-lace girl gave, and would not have understood the subtle compliment implied therein if she had--got on her feet, and moved dizzily out to the front.
It may seem easy enough to account for all this, by reflecting that the theatrical stage is nothing more than a representation, or, as Aristotle calls it, an imitation of what really exists; and hence, perhaps, we might fairly pay a very high compliment to those who by their writings or actions have been so capable of imitating life, as to have their pictures in a manner confounded with, or mistaken for, the originals.
Indeed, Amelia dressed in her wedding-pelisse and pink ribbons, with a flush in her face, occasioned by rapid travel through the open air, looked so fresh and pretty, as fully to justify the Ensign's compliment.