complication


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complication

 [kom″plĭ-ka´shun]
1. one or more disease(s) concurrent with another disease.
2. the occurrence of two or more diseases in the same patient.
3. an injury or disorder occurring in a patient with a pre-existing condition.

com·pli·ca·tion

(kom'pli-kā'shŭn),
A morbid process or event that occurs during the course of a disease that is not an essential part of that disease, although it may result from it or from independent causes.

complication

/com·pli·ca·tion/ (kom″plĭ-ka´shun)
1. disease(s) concurrent with another disease.
2. occurrence of several diseases in the same patient.

complication

(kŏm′plĭ-kā′shən)
n.
Medicine A secondary disease, an accident, or a negative reaction occurring during the course of an illness and usually aggravating the illness.

complication

Etymology: L, complicare, to fold together
1 a disease or injury that develops during the treatment of a preexisting disorder. An example is a bacterial infection that is acquired by a person weakened by a viral infection. The complication frequently alters the prognosis.
2 a problem that arises during labor that puts the neonate, mother, or both at risk.

complication

1. Any adverse medical response to a procedure or therapy; in drug therapy, aka, adverse–side effects, see there.
2. The simultaneous presentation of 2 or more diseases Patient management Any adverse or undesired result of disease management. See Contraindication, Indication.

com·pli·ca·tion

(kom'pli-kā'shŭn)
A morbid process or event occurring during a disease that is not an essential part of the disease, although it may result from it or from independent causes.

complication

An additional disorder, or new feature, arising in the course of, or as a result of, a disease, injury or abnormality.

complication

a process or event that interrupts or changes the prognosis of a disease or its treatment

com·pli·ca·tion

(kom'pli-kā'shŭn)
Morbid process or event that occurs during course of a disease but is not an essential part of it.

complication (kom´plikā´shən),

n a disease or injury that develops during the treatment of an earlier disorder. An example is a bacterial infection acquired by a person weakened by a viral infection.

complication

1. a disease(s) concurrent with another disease.
2. the occurrence of two or more diseases in the same patient.
3. the occurrence of a second disease as a consequence of the first.

Patient discussion about complication

Q. What Are the Complications of Obesity? Why is obesity so dangerous? What are the possible complications of being obese?

A. Excessive body weight has been shown to predispose to various diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleep disturbances (sleep apnea) and osteoarthritis. Obesity is one of the major risk factors for developing a heart attack, as well as hypertension and stroke. It is also a risk factor for breast, colon, prostate cancer and other malignancies. It is known that losing weight helps to reduce the risk of suffering from these diseases.

Q. What Are the Complications of Alcoholism? What is the damage and complications cause by alcoholism?

A. the complications very by each individual,everyone is different,but alcoholism it not only hurts you, but it hurts everyone around you also,your playing with a loaded gun.

Q. What are the complications of osteoarthritis? I have been suffering from osteoarthritis for over a year now. What are the complications of this disease?

A. Osteoarthritis, as other chronic arthritic diseases, has a very debilitating influence, due to the great pain people often suffer from. It sometimes becomes impossible to walk or stand up, and thus it lead to less movement, weight gain, development of blood clots and venous stasis. The emotional stress can be very debilitating as well.

More discussions about complication
References in periodicals archive ?
Descriptive statistics of demographic information were calculated, and to identify risk factors associated with the development of a "severe" post-operative complication, univariate and multivariate step-wise logistic regression analysis were used.
Over the years variable complication rates have been described in literature; prospective data in 1984 showed an overall complication rate of 8.
One elderly patient with a diabetic mellitus history had a major complication when wound infection developed on postoperative day 10 that required antibiotics treatment.
011%) developed SVT- a complication which had not been selected as an outcome variable but merited mention because frequency of arrhythmias in this setting is very low in the published literature and we encountered this rare complication.
Hematomas (blood collections) were the most common major complication, followed by infections, blood clots (venous thromboembolism), and lung-related problems.
In our country because of poor understanding of complications and other social and economic factors, neurological complication has become one of the most feared complications.
The next most common complication, hospitalizations, peaked at 34.
7% as the most frequent intermediate complication while stomal infection and scabs formation were second most commonly encountered complication as 7.
8 %) had no complication and underwent normal vaginal delivery.
Severe complications included seizures, encephalopathy, pneumonia, bacteremia, bacterial tracheitis, respiratory failure, myocarditis, or death.