complete protein


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complete protein

a protein that contains all the essential amino acids in appropriate amounts to allow normal growth and tissue maintenance when adequate energy is provided in the diet. Examples are casein (milk protein), eggs, fish, poultry, cheese, meat and some whole grains, such as quinoa.

complete protein

A popular term for any protein that contains all of the essential amino acids.

complete protein

A protein containing all the essential amino acids.
See also: protein

protein

any large organic compound made from one or more polypeptides, which are chains of amino acids joined in a genetically determined order by peptide linkages between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of the next. They contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen and usually sulfur, occasionally phosphorus.
Proteins form a large and essential part of the body mass, comprising especially cell membranes, connective tissue, muscles, enzymes, hormones, blood proteins. To maintain this mass the diet must contain a high proportion of protein, especially in growing animals and those recovering from debilitating diseases.

protein A
a surface protein of Staphylococus aureus which binds to the Fc region of some IgG molecules. Fluorochrome-labeled protein A is used in an indirect immunofluorescence test for detecting bound immunoglobulins.
authentic protein
a recombinant protein with all its naturally occurring properties.
available protein
the portion of dietary protein that can be used by the animal.
protein binding
a property of many drugs which limits their distribution and availability in the blood, as well as affecting elimination from the body.
protein bumps
see bumps.
protein C
a circulating vitamin K-dependent protein with anticoagulant effects. Promotes fibrinolysis.
protein-calories
calories derived from proteins in the diet.
protein calorie malnutrition
inadequate protein in the diet leads to impaired cell-mediated immunity, delayed wound healing and loss of lean body mass.
protein-calorie ratio
the number of calories provided from protein sources, compared with the total caloric intake; an indication of the level of protein intake.
carrier protein
one which, when coupled to a hapten, renders it capable of eliciting an immune response.
complete protein
one containing the essential amino acids in the proportion required in the diet.
protein concentrates
feeds containing a high concentration of protein, e.g. legume grains and forages, meat meal, fish meal, oil cakes, milling residues including bran, shorts, middlings, brewer's grains.
conjugated p's
those in which the protein molecule is united with nonprotein molecules or prosthetic groups, e.g. glycoproteins, lipoproteins and metalloproteins.
protein-creatinine ratio
in urine is valuable in correcting for variation in urine contents due to variable dilutions.
crude protein
the total nitrogen content of a feed multiplied by 6.25. Includes several obvious errors but is still a close approximation of the protein content.
dietary protein
is usually the most expensive part of the diet, except for animals at pasture, and the constituent most likely to be deficient. An excess of protein in the diet in ruminants can cause a sharp rise in alkalinity, due to the release of ammonia, of the ruminal contents causing ruminal atony and indigestion.
digestible protein
the crude protein ingested less the protein excreted in the feces. The estimation requires a digestibility trial involving animals.
protein equivalent
said of a feed. The total nitrogen content expressed as protein if it were all in that form. That is the percentage nitrogen in the feed multiplied by the average percentage of nitrogen in plant protein (6.25%).
protein excretion t
one that uses 51Cr-labeled protein which measures protein excretion in the feces in cases of protein-losing enteropathy.
protein-fibrinogen ratio
see plasma protein:fibrinogen ratio.
fibrous p's
characterized by shape, structure and low water solubility; they have a structural role. Examples are collagen, keratin and tropomyosin.
fusion protein
in recombinant DNA technology when a foreign gene is inserted into a plasmid vector to interrupt a gene, such as lacZ, the mRNA transcript of the recombinant plasmid contains the lacZ Shine-Dalgarno sequence and codons for the 3′ end of the lacZ gene protein followed by the codons of the foreign gene; the protein expressed is a fusion protein containing a few N-terminal lacZ amino acids and the contiguous foreign protein.
protein hydrolysates
pharmaceutical preparations used in the treatment of severe, acute protein loss. Available for use orally or parenterally. They are partly digested proteins and contain a mixture of polypeptides, amino acids and other breakdown products.
protein microarray
an ordered set of small samples of proteins immobilized on a microscope slide or other solid surface that is used to determine protein-protein interactions.
myeloma protein
see multiple myeloma.
protein nutritional deficiency
causes lack of muscle development, and slow growth rate and maturation. In adults there is a low milk production and poor weight gain. In severe states tissue and blood levels fall, hypoproteinemic edema may occur, and a degree of immunosuppression could be expected.
partial protein
one having a ratio of essential amino acids different from that of the average body protein.
peripheral protein
any protein located in the membrane but not essential to the reconstitution of that protein.
plasma p's
all the proteins present in the blood plasma, including the immunoglobulins. See plasma protein.
polyhedrin matrix protein
a protein that comprises the major component of occlusion bodies produced by nuclear polyhedrosis virus and cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus; the strong polyhedrin promoter is utilized in the expression of recombinant proteins in baculovirus expression systems.
rec A protein
an enzyme that binds to DNA and plays an important role in genetic recombination.
protein S
a circulating vitamin K-dependent protein with anticoagulant effects.
serum protein
proteins in the blood serum, including immunoglobulins, albumin, complement, coagulation factors and enzymes.
protein shock
anaphylaxis occurring after the intravenous injection of protein.
protein-sparing
in times of energy deficiency the animal body may raid protein stores for glucogenic amino acids, thus depleting body stores of proteins. Substances such as acetic acid which can fill the energy deficiency and avoid the protein loss are known as protein-sparing.
protein supplements
feeds which contain more than 20% protein.
urine protein
viral protein
proteins encoded by the viral genome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Buckwheat is a highly nutritious, gluten-free grain substitute that contains a rich supply of soluble and insoluble fiber, complete protein, and novel phytocompounds.
According to the original theory, complete proteins had all of the essential amino acids in the right proportions to be used by the body, while incomplete proteins lacked certain amino acids and did not have them in the right proportions.
In evolutionary terms, cooking is a relatively new phenomenon so originally we could only have obtained our complete protein from animals because we existed/evolved long before cooking became the norm (agriculture only started about 12,000 years ago).
Whey's protein composed of lacto albumin and lacto globulin, those consider as a complete protein with high .
Quinoa contains all the essential amino acids, is a complete protein and is very easy to digest.
Eat a post-game or a post-practice meal high in carbohydrates and high quality, complete protein.
However, by combining pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas etc) with grains such as rice and couscous you are getting the complete protein needed for tissue rebuilding and cell renewal.
Open reading frame: a reading frame in a genetic sequence that does not contain a signal to stop protein translation (see below) before creating a complete protein.
The body will make its own complete protein if a variety of foods and enough calories are eaten during the day.
This breakthrough design lies at the heart of the new Investigator ProPREP, enabling the instrument to complete protein digestion with no aspiration steps, thus eliminating cross contamination concerns.
Proteomics--describing the complete protein complement of an organism--has thus developed as the adjunct to genomics.
In mouse muscle, the two pieces produce a complete protein.