complete dislocation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dislocation

 [dis″lo-ka´shun]
displacement of a bone from a joint; called also luxation. The most common ones involve a finger, thumb, shoulder, or hip; less common are those of the mandible, elbow, or knee. Symptoms include loss of motion, temporary paralysis of the joint, pain, swelling, and sometimes shock. Dislocations are usually caused by a blow or fall, although unusual physical effort may also cause one. A few dislocations, especially of the hip, are congenital, usually from a faulty construction of the joint, and are best treated in infancy with a cast and possibly surgery.

A dislocation should be treated as a fracture when first aid is administered. First aid includes checking for a pulse distal to the location and keeping the patient as still as possible. The patient is moved as a whole unit on a long board or a stretcher. As soon as possible the dislocation must be reduced by a surgeon.
Shoulder dislocation.
complete dislocation one in which the surfaces are entirely separated.
compound dislocation one in which the joint communicates with the outside air through a wound.
congenital dislocation of the hip a former name for developmental dysplasia of the hip.
pathologic dislocation one due to disease of the joint or to paralysis of the muscles.
simple dislocation one in which there is no communication with the air through a wound.

complete dislocation

Etymology: L, complere, to fill up, dis, apart, locare, to place
a dislocation in which the articular surfaces of the joint are completely separated.

complete dislocation

A dislocation that separates the surfaces of a joint completely.
See also: dislocation

dislocation

1. displacement of a bone from a joint. Signs include loss of motion, temporary paralysis of the involved joint, pain and swelling, and sometimes shock. Some dislocations, especially of the hip, are congenital, usually resulting from a faulty construction of the joint.
2. displacement of the lens in the eye. See lens luxation.

complete dislocation
one in which the surfaces are entirely separated.
compound dislocation
one in which the joint communicates with the outside air through a wound.
pathological dislocation
one due to disease of the joint or to paralysis of the muscles.
simple dislocation
one in which there is no communication with the air through a wound.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reconstruction of chronic and complete dislocations of the acromioclavicular joint.
This leads to complete dislocation, while the externally rotated leg is placed in an aseptic bag on the opposite side of the operating table.
At birth, the femoral head is at its most shallow, (9) and with an 'abnormal' hip posture and general joint laxity this can result in subluxation or complete dislocation.

Full browser ?