complement protein


Also found in: Acronyms.

complement protein

n.
A substance that is produced by a predecessor protein or in response to the presence of foreign material in the body and that triggers or participates in a complement reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
What it does mean, Barres says, is that these delicate connections are "primed" with complement protein, poised to call out for help if injury or major illness strikes.
The system is "activated" either by the interaction of complement proteins with antibody-antigen complexes (classical pathway) or by interaction with the unusual carbohydrate found on the surface of pathogenic (non-self) organisms (lectin and alternative pathways).
Elevated levels of serum complement proteins, C3c and C4, were detected in patients with CE compared to healthy controls.
Structure and biology of complement protein C3, a connecting link between innate and acquired immunity.
In a normal immune response, some complement proteins activate neutrophils to combat bacteria.
Nasdaq: GLIA) under which Gliatech will use Abgenix' XenoMouse(TM) technology to generate fully human monoclonal antibodies to the complement protein properdin for use in the fields of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases.
The first complement molecule, which is called C1Q, recognizes the attached antibody and activates the next complement protein - and so on down the line.
Nasdaq: ABGX) under which Gliatech will use Abgenix's XenoMouse(TM) technology to generate fully human monoclonal antibodies to the complement protein properdin for use in the fields of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases.
The Fc portion of an antibody plays a critical functional role by binding to various cellular receptors as well as complement proteins, and it is responsible for recruiting other immune system cells to attack the tumor cell resulting in destruction of the targeted cell.
Based on findings that humans with OA have an excess of complement proteins in their joint fluid, researchers explored further.
Surviving in blood serum despite the presence of active complement proteins is well known as a virulence factor among isolates of Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae.

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