complaint

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com·plaint

(kom-plānt'),
A disorder, disease, or symptom, or the description of it.
[O.Fr. complainte, fr. L. complango, to lament]

complaint

/com·plaint/ (kom-plānt´) a disease, symptom, or disorder.
chief complaint  the symptom or group of symptoms about which the patient first consults the doctor; the presenting symptom.

complaint

(kəm-plānt′)
n.
a. A bodily disorder or disease; a malady or ailment.
b. The symptom or distress about which a patient seeks medical assistance.

complaint

Etymology: L, complangere, to beat the breast
1 (in law) a pleading by a plaintiff made under oath to initiate a suit. It is a statement of the formal charge and the cause for action against the defendant. For a minor offense the defendant is tried on the basis of the complaint. A more serious felony prosecution requires an indictment with evidence presented by a state's attorney.
2
Usage notes: (informal)
any ailment, problem, or symptom identified by the client, patient, member of the person's family, or other knowledgeable person. The chief complaint often causes the person to seek health care.
A symptom of which a person is aware or which causes discomfort, generally described from a patient’s perspective—e.g., loss of weight, crushing chest pain, fever of unknown origin (FUO)—and which is often the principal reason for seeking medical attention; in the working parlance in the US, complaints are divided into chief—major—complaints and minor complaints

complaint

A Sx of which a person is aware or which causes discomfort, generally described from a Pt's perspective–eg, loss of weight, crushing chest pain, FUO, and is often the principal reason for seeking medical attention; in the working parlance in the US, complaints are divided into chief–major complaints and minor complaints. See Chief complaint, Minor complaint.

com·plaint

(kŏm-plānt')
A disorder, disease, or symptom, or the description of it.
[O.Fr. complainte, fr. L. complango, to lament]

complaint,

n a patient-described symptom, problem, or malady. See also illness and disease.

com·plaint

(kŏm-plānt')
A disorder, disease, or symptom, or the description of it.
[O.Fr. complainte, fr. L. complango, to lament]

complaint,

n an ailment, problem, or symptom disclosed by the patient.
complaint, chief (CC),
n the main symptom or reason for which the patient seeks treatment. The most troublesome ailment, problem, or symptom.
References in classic literature ?
In Tom's external situation, at this time, there was, as the world says, nothing to complain of Little Eva's fancy for him--the instinctive gratitude and loveliness of a noble nature--had led her to petition her father that he might be her especial attendant, whenever she needed the escort of a servant, in her walks or rides; and Tom had general orders to let everything else go, and attend to Miss Eva whenever she wanted him,--orders which our readers may fancy were far from disagreeable to him.
She stared, but soon comprehending why I counselled her to utter the falsehood, she assured me she would not complain.
He'll shut his eyes to every consideration of prudence, and pester you to marry him; and when he has carried his point, he will be the first to turn round afterward and complain that you're a burden on him.
Samson and his men complain sometimes, of being exhausted.
But I do not at all complain of having been kept out of this property; and if anybody else should be in the present enjoyment of it, he is heartily welcome to keep it.
As to all the rest, he was humble and contrite, and I never knew him complain.
That is the truth," said Don Quixote, "and if I make no complaint of the pain it is because knights-errant are not permitted to complain of any wound, even though their bowels be coming out through it.
On the contrary, she was as much disposed to complain of it as her husband.
When one has to complain of anything, it is generally an individual who is the cause of it.
I arrived here in safety, and have no reason to complain of my reception from Mr.
I think the complaint was confession: a religious church would not complain.
Upjohn came sometimes before Philip was in, and then Cronshaw would complain of him bitterly.