compensatory


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

com·pen·sa·to·ry

(kom-pen'să-tōr'ē),
Providing compensation; making up for a deficiency or loss.

compensatory

/com·pen·sa·to·ry/ (kom-pen´sah-tor″e) making good a defect or loss; restoring a lost balance.

com·pen·sa·to·ry

(kŏm-pen'să-tōr-ē)
Providing compensation; making up for a deficiency or loss.

compensatory

pertaining to or emanating from compensation.

compensatory hypertrophy
impaired function of one organ in a paired organ system or of part of an organ in a single organ system is followed by enlargement of the surviving organ or tissue so that functional capacity is maintained.
References in periodicals archive ?
But the new regulations do not apply to old contracts established before March 1 in which employees and employers had agreed on only compensatory leave for overtime, the ministry added.
In order to evaluate the possible benefits of compensatory like growth in cross breeding, it is necessary to understand the dynamics change underlying this genetic trait.
For this reason, the welfarist rationale for the Pareto principle extends to nonideal conditions in which transaction costs prevent fully compensatory consensual exchanges.
Do plants produce large compensatory shoots in response to browsing in order to grow taller so that new shoots can grow beyond the reach of terrestrial herbivores, or are they attempting to grow above interspecific competitors in order to secure more sunlight?
These may take the form of absolute monetary caps, a maximum ratio of punitive to compensatory damages, or, often, some combination of the two.
A model of the process of compensatory consumption has been created by Gronmo (1988).
For example, if the employee started a new job immediately after the dismissal on the same wages, he/she may have a nil loss of earnings and therefore be awarded no compensatory element.
Such mitigation is referred to as compensatory wetland mitigation and is performed on-site and off-site of the proposed project.
She contended that the Supreme Court alluded to the notion of human capital in Glenshaw Glass, where it distinguished taxable punitive damages from damages for personal injury; the latter, it held, are compensatory in nature and therefore not taxable income.
No provision in the law of 16 March 1971 on compensatory rest periods in the event of derogations to daily rest period.
If the warrant is compensatory and does not have a readily ascertainable fair market value, it is not taxable on grant or issue.
Sands, Adams, & Stout (1995) found that teacher training in curriculum development and modification was most likely to take place through "on-the-job" experiences and that teachers wanted more training in the areas of curriculum for teaching compensatory skills and life skills.