compensable


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compensable

(kŏm-pĕn′sŭ-b'l) [L. compensare, to counterbalance]
Reimbursable; entitled to or warranting compensation. Payable under the protections granted by worker's compensation or by other legal entities that give monetary awards to injured parties.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the FLSA requires employers to pay their employees a wage for all the work that they do, recent case law suggests that not all work-related activities are compensable.
Part III uses the ethical justifications and the regulatory lessons developed earlier in the article to argue for a morally justified approach to defining compensable research injuries.
Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division says: "At the most basic level, there could be a clear ruling saying the Ninth Circuit is wrong; time going through screenings is not compensable because ifs indispensable.
They will provide an in-depth discussion of FLSA rules concerning compensable time issues and requirements.
The court found that under Louisiana law, MCTA's right to collect assessments is not a compensable property interest.
Article advocates treating these regulations as compensable takings.
Where donning and doffing must be paid, and where actual working time must be recorded starting from the beginning of the employee's dressing into uniform and putting on safety equipment, the employee's subsequent time spent walking, waiting and performing other activities during the workday is increasingly likely to be viewed as part of the continuous workday--and thus, to be compensable under the FLSA.
Since the FLSA requires employers to pay employees for all hours worked, even those in addition to a prescribed schedule if the employer knows or has reason to know the employee is working, then yes, this time may be compensable.
The NICA statute specifies several requirements for bringing a compensable claim under the plan.
With the passage of the Portal-to-Portal Act, Congress excepted two activities that had been found to be compensable by the Supreme Court: one, walking on the employer's premises to and from the actual place of performance of the principal activity of the employee and two, activities that are "preliminary or postliminary" to that principal activity.
Barbara's employer accepted her claims as compensable under Workers' Compensation.