compassion


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compassion

 [kom-pă´shun]
in bioethics, a virtue combining concepts such as sympathy, empathy, fellow feeling, benevolence, care, love, and sometimes pity and mercy. These are character traits that enable professionals to use their cognitive and psychomotor skills of healing to meet the needs of a particular patient. The need for particularity in the healing relationship makes compassion a moral virtue.

compassion

(kŏm-pash′ŏn) [ comp- + passion]
Awareness of and feeling for the pain and suffering of others; sympathy.

compassion,

n a profound awareness of another's suffering coupled with a desire to alleviate that suffering.
References in classic literature ?
There was an earnest womanly compassion for me in her new affection.
He told her all that happened, and because she was pleased with him she took compassion on him, and said she would help him.
Mahomet, who was in possession of the mountains, being informed by his spies that the Portuguese were but four hundred, encamped in the plain of Ballut, and sent a message to the general that he knew the Abyssins had imposed on the King of Portugal, which, being acquainted with their treachery, he was not surprised at, and that in compassion of the commander's youth, he would give him and his men, if they would return, free passage, and furnish them with necessaries; that he might consult upon the matter, and depend upon his word, reminding him, however, that it was not safe to refuse his offer.
This being so, I say I thank you, sirs, for the offer you have made me, which places me under the obligation of complying with the request you have made of me; though I fear the account I shall give you of my misfortunes will excite in you as much concern as compassion, for you will be unable to suggest anything to remedy them or any consolation to alleviate them.
Really, You were only before sparkling, but now you are brilliant; take compassion on us, or, like Jupiter, you will wither us up.
No seaman can look without compassion upon a disabled ship, but to look at a sailing-vessel with her lofty spars gone is to look upon a defeated but indomitable warrior.
Revenge triumphs over death; love slights it; honor aspireth to it; grief flieth to it; fear preoccupateth it; nay, we read, after Otho the emperor had slain himself, pity (which is the tenderest of affections) provoked many to die, out of mere compassion to their sovereign, and as the truest sort of followers.
Beaufort had not taken the tone that such misfortunes (the word was her own) were "the test of friendship," compassion for her might have tempered the general indignation against her husband.
Whenever she went out -- and compassion for her misadventure made her friends eager to entertain her -- she bore a demeanour that was perfect.
He threw himself, therefore, into the love for his little Jehan with the passion of a character already profound, ardent, concentrated; that poor frail creature, pretty, fair- haired, rosy, and curly,--that orphan with another orphan for his only support, touched him to the bottom of his heart; and grave thinker as he was, he set to meditating upon Jehan with an infinite compassion.
The men had by this time surrounded the dead and wounded officers, and without either partiality or compassion proceeded to throw both living and dead over the sides of the vessel.
At the bottom of the staircase, the dog quietly looked at him whilst he was passing; Cornelius even fancied he saw in the eyes of the monster a certain expression as it were of compassion.