compact

(redirected from compacts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to compacts: compact cameras

compact

/com·pact/ (kom´pakt) (kom-pakt´) dense; having a dense structure.

compact

(kŏm′păkt)
Closely and tightly packed together; solid.

compact,

v to form by uniting or condensing particles with the application of pressure (e.g., the progressive insertion and welding of foil and the building up of plastic amalgam in a preparation).
References in classic literature ?
That is, perhaps, the only instance in human history of that positive, original social compact, which speculative philosophers have imagined as the only legitimate source of government.
The more intimate the nature of such a union may be, the greater interest have the members in the political institutions of each other; and the greater right to insist that the forms of government under which the compact was entered into should be SUBSTANTIALLY maintained.
suddenly a round compact cloud of smoke was seen merging from violet into gray and milky white, and "boom
So the compact was made and General Guph was delighted with his success in gaining such powerful allies.
Anne had draped that veil, in accordance with the sentimental compact of years before.
White Fang grew stronger, heavier, and more compact, while his character was developing along the lines laid down by his heredity and his environment.
Instead of a house they found only fire-blackened foundations of stone, enclosing an area of compact ashes pitted by rains.
It had welded into one compact political mass the whole of North America from the Panama Canal to the Arctic Ocean.
Gilbert agreed with her, and they made a solemn compact on the subject--a compact which Anne shamelessly violated the very first moment Little Jem was laid in her arms.
After the sand appeared some compact white clay, resembling the chalk of Great Britain, which extended down to a depth of four feet.
In his tragedies, 'Sejanus' and 'Catiline,' he excluded comic material; for the most part he kept scenes of death and violence off the stage; and he very carefully and slowly constructed plays which have nothing, indeed, of the poetic greatness of Sophocles or Euripides (rather a Jonsonese broad solidity) but which move steadily to their climaxes and then on to the catastrophes in the compact classical manner.
Three people have used that very phrase about Kaulbach to me today already, just as though they had made a compact about it.