comorbidity


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comorbidity

 [ko″mor-bid´ĭ-te]
1. a comorbid disease or condition.
2. the state of being comorbid.
3. the extent to which two pathological conditions occur together in a given population.

co·mor·bid·i·ty

(kō'mōr-bid'i-tē),
A concomitant but unrelated pathologic or disease process; usually used in epidemiology to indicate the coexistence of two or more disease processes.
[co- + L. morbidus, diseased]

comorbidity

two or more coexisting medical conditions or disease processes that are additional to an initial diagnosis.

comorbidity

The simultaneous presence of 2+ morbid conditions or diseases in the same Pt, which may complicate a Pt's hospital stay; in the US health care system, comorbidity carries considerable weight in determining the reasonable length of hospitalization under the DRG classification of diseases. See DRGs.

co·mor·bid·i·ty

(kō-mōr-bid'i-tē)
1. A concomitant but unrelated pathologic or disease process.
2. epidemiology Coexistence of two or more disease processes.
[co- + L. morbidus, diseased]

comorbidity (kōˈ·mōr·biˑ·d·tē),

n presence of additional conditions with the initially diagnosed illness.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the mechanism associated with comorbidities is a crowd-out and/or exposure effect, the comorbidity would be a proxy for a system variable and should be considered as a disparity according to the IOM definition.
Although some may consider depression to be neurological comorbidity, it is included as a medical comorbidity in this article because of(a) its numerous causes such as chronic stress and reaction to grief and loss, which are non-neurological in origin, and (b) its appearance as a common medical condition with nearly 20% of primary care patients presenting symptoms of depression (Zung, Broadhead, & Roth, 1993).
Pathological gambling; etiology, comorbidity, and treatments.
The most common organ systems affected by medical comorbidity were the musculoskeletal, respiratory, and endocrine systems (in 33%, 27%, and 25% of participants).
They found that during the study period, 419 men died, out of which, 200 had no underlying comorbidity, 176 had one coronary artery disease risk factor, and 43 had a history of known coronary artery disease resulting in congestive heart failure or heart attack.
There are two potential limitations to the IPF-PPS comorbidity adjustors.
The researchers cautioned that the $193 billion estimate of lost earnings is probably low because the Comorbidity Survey Replications included very few participants with autism, schizophrenia, or other chronic illnesses that are known to greatly affect a person's ability to work.
The relationship between comorbidity and late stage at diagnosis was examined using multiple logistic regression.
Prevalence, severity and comorbidity of 12-month DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.
The rate of colonoscopy follow-up within 12 months also decreased with advancing age and increasing Charlson comorbidity score.
Combined with chlorambucil, Roche's Gazyva is expected to provide a first-line option for patients whose comorbidity burden precludes standard treatment.